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Books Books 1 - 10 of 59 on Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention,....  
" Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection. "
Letters to Mothers - Page 182
by Lydia Howard Sigourney - 1845 - 297 pages
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Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind

Dugald Stewart - Psychology - 1802 - 587 pages
...different fubjefts which may pafs unde our review. Nothing, in truth, has fuch a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extenfive and various reading, without reflexion. The activity and force of the mind are...
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An elementary treatise on logic: comprising the essential principles and ...

Hezekiah G. Ufford - Logic - 1823 - 192 pages
...has Mr. Stewart relative to method in reading ? A. " Nothing (says he) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection. The activity and force of the mind are...
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Elements of intellectual philosophy: designed as a textbook

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Intellect - 1827 - 504 pages
...manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing (says Dugald Stewart) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fully to understand...
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The Remains of Nathaniel Appleton Haven: With a Memoir of His Life by George ...

Nathaniel Appleton Haven - 1827 - 351 pages
...intellectual purpose, than indolent reading. " Nothing," says Stewart, " has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." The divided attention we often give to...
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The Remains of Nathaniel Appleton Haven: With a Memoir of His Life by George ...

Nathaniel Appleton Haven - American literature - 1827 - 351 pages
...intellectual purpose, than indolent reading. " Nothing," says Stewart, " has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." The divided attention we often give to...
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The American Reader: Containing Extracts Suited to Excite a Love of Science ...

Readers and speakers - 1828 - 276 pages
...manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing, (saysDugald Stuart) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fully to understand...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the human mind

Dugald Stewart - 1829
...different subjects which may pass under our review. Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. .The activity and force of the mind are...
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Elements of mental philosophy: abridged and designed as a text book for ...

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Intellect - 1832 - 600 pages
...manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing (says Dugald Stewart,) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fully to understand...
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A Popular and Practical Introduction to Law Studies

Samuel Warren - Law - 1835 - 552 pages
...reading and reflection. " Nothing, in truth," says Dugald Stewart, " has such a tendency to weaken not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. The activity and force of mind are gradually...
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The Methodist Review, Volume 7; Volume 18

Methodist Church - 1836
..." Nothing," says an extensive and accomplished writer, (Stewart,) " has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as this." Yet by how many is it practised? Forgetful of our maxim, that nothing valuable can be acquired...
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