Pests of Paradise: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Injuries from Hawaii's Animals (Google eBook)

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University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 2000 - Medical - 190 pages
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Do earwigs really crawl into people's ears? Is the sting of a Hawaiian scorpion medically dangerous? Pests of Paradise, a carefully researched and well-illustrated reference book about injuries and infections from animals found in Hawai'i, answers these questions and many more in everyday language and in a user-friendly format. It describes each animal in words and color photos, then identifies the mechanism of injury, incidence, prevention, and signs and symptoms of injury or infection. The authors offer first aid recommendations and discuss advanced medical treatment based on the latest published literature.
  

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Contents

Ant Bites and Stings
3
Bedbug Bites
12
Bee Stings
16
Botfly Infestations
26
Cat Bites and Scratches
31
Centipede Stings
37
Cockroach Ear Invasions and Allergies
41
Dog Bites
46
Scorpion Bites
87
Spider Bites
91
Tick Bites
97
Toad Secretions
101
Wasp Stings
107
Worm Infestations
115
Wound Care
120
Brucellosis
129

Earwig Ear Invasions
51
Flea Bites
55
Fly Bites and Contamination
59
Frog Secretions
62
Kissing Bug Bites
65
Lice Infestations
68
Millipede Spray
74
Mite Bites and Allergies
77
Mosquito Bites
83
Eosinophilic
132
Laysan Fever
135
Leptospirosis
140
Murine Typhus
146
Trichinosis
150
Notes and References
153
Bibliography
159
Index
187
Copyright

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Page 178 - T., 1975. Eosinophilic meningitis in Thailand. Clinical studies of 484 typical cases probably caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Am. J.

About the author (2000)

Susan Scott maintains and international consulting practice through her firm, Fierce Conversations Inc., which provides Fierce Leadership, and Fierce Coaching programs to CEO's and executives. For fourteen years, she ran think tanks and seminars for business leaders through The Executive Committee (TEC) International. Scott was raised in Tennessee and now lives in Seattle, Washington.

Thomas has practiced emergency medicine in Hawaii since 1983. He is a member of the clinical faculty at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii; president of Hawaii Emergency Physicians, Associated, Inc.,; and medical director for the Honolulu Fire Department and the Honolulu Police Department.

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