The History of the Hundred of Wirral: With a Sketch of the City and County of Chester (Google eBook)

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Whittaker & Company, 1847 - Cheshire (England) - 476 pages
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Page 31 - As the Normans were marshalled in three divisions, so they began the battle by simultaneous attacks upon three points of the English forces. Immediately before the duke rode Taillefer the minstrel, singing, with a loud and clear voice, the lay of Charlemagne and Roland, and the emprises of the paladins who had fallen in the dolorous Pass of Roncevaux. Taillefer, as his guerdon, had craved permission to strike the first blow; for he was a valiant warrior, emulating the deeds which he sung. His appellation...
Page 153 - Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise appertaining, and the reversion and reversions, remainder and remainders, rents, issues, and profits thereof...
Page 153 - Act. in as full and ample a manner to all intents and purposes as if the same privileges and protections were repeated and re-enacted in this Act.
Page 305 - Edward by the grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine...
Page 107 - ... they dare attempt it. The work goes forwards, and they, like so many valiant Amazons, do outface death and dare danger, though it lurk in every basket. Seven are shot and three slain, yet they scorn to leave their matchless undertaking ; and thus they continued for ten days' space, possessing the beholders that they are immaculate!
Page 31 - Englishman whom he attacked, and by felling the second to the ground. The battle now became general, and raged with the greatest fury. The Normans advanced beyond the English lines, but they were driven back, and forced into a trench, where horses and riders fell upon each other in fearful confusion. More Normans were slain here, than in any other part of the field. The alarm spread ; the light troops left in charge of the baggage and the stores thought that all was lost, and were about to take flight,...
Page 33 - By William's orders, a spot close to the Gonfanon -was cleared, and he caused his pavilion to be pitched among the corpses which were heaped around. He there supped with his barons ; and they feasted among the dead. But when he contemplated the fearful slaughter, a natural feeling of pity, perhaps allied to repentance, arose in his stern mind ; and the Abbey of Battle, in which the prayer was to be offered up perpetually for the repose of the souls of all who had fallen in the conflict, was at once...
Page 7 - The barbarians drive us to the sea; the sea throws us back on the barbarians; thus two modes of death await us; we are either slain or drowned.
Page 36 - No recollection dwelt upon his name, as the hero who would sally forth from his seclusion, the restorer of the Anglo-Saxon power. That power had wholly fallen and if the humbled Englishman, as he paced the aisles of Waltham, looked around, and, having assured himself that no Norman was near, whispered to his son, that the tomb which they saw before them was raised only in mockery, and that Harold still breathed the vital air he yet knew too well that the spot where Harold's standard had been...
Page 305 - Confessor, have granted and given license, for us and our heirs, as much as in us is, to our beloved...

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