The Modern Researcher

Front Cover
Jacques Barzun, Henry Henry Franklin Graff
Wadsworth/Cengage Learning, 2004 - Reference - 322 pages
6 Reviews
This classic introduction to the techniques of research and the art of expression is used widely in history courses, but is also appropriate for writing and research methods courses in other departments. Barzun and Graff thoroughly cover every aspect of research, from the selection of a topic through the gathering, analysis, writing, revision, and publication of findings presenting the process not as a set of rules but through actual cases that put the subtleties of research in a useful context. Part One covers the principles and methods of research; Part Two covers writing, speaking, and getting one's work published.

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Review: The Modern Researcher (with Infotrac) [With Infotrac]

User Review  - Dorothea - Goodreads

I asked a history professor to recommend a book about how to do historical research, and got this. I have to say I won't be passing the recommendation on. Here's what I liked: * Some of the sections ... Read full review

Review: The Modern Researcher (with Infotrac) [With Infotrac]

User Review  - Laurie - Goodreads

Just remembering my arranged marriage with this book in 1987 brought on the olfactory memory of card catalogs, bound periodical indexes, sour-faced university librarians, and the chalk-dusted ... Read full review

About the author (2004)

Jacques Barzun was born in Créteil, France on November 30, 1907. He came to the United States in 1920 and graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in 1927. Following graduation, he joined Columbia's faculty as an instructor while continuing his studies in graduate school there, receiving a master's degree in 1928 and a doctorate in French history in 1932. He became a full professor in 1945, was dean of graduate faculties from 1955 to 1958, and dean of faculties from 1958 to 1967. He retired from Columbia University in 1975. He was a historian and cultural critic. The core of his work was the importance of studying history to understand the present and a fundamental respect for intellect. Although he wrote on subjects as diverse as detective fiction and baseball, he was especially known for his many books on music, nineteenth-century romanticism and education. His works include Darwin, Marx and Wagner: Critique of a Heritage; Romanticism and the Modern Ego; The House of Intellect; Race: A Study in Superstition; Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers; A Stroll with William James; The Culture We Deserve; and From Dawn to Decadence. He died on October 25, 2012 at the age of 104.

Henry F. Graff is a professor emeritus of history at Columbia University, where he taught his pioneering seminar on the presidency. He is a frequent commentator on radio and television. Graff lives in New York.

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