My Spouse and I: An Operatical Farce, in Two Acts (Google eBook)

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Whittingham and Arliss, 1815 - Musicals - 44 pages
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Page 48 - New mathematical and philosophical dictionary; comprising an explanation of the terms and principles of pure and mixed mathematics and such branches of natural philosophy as are susceptible of mathematical investigation; with historical sketches of the rise, progress and present state of the several departments of these sciences: and an account of the discoveries and writings of the most celebrated authors, both ancient and modern.
Page 46 - An Inquiry concerning the Author of the Letters of Junius; in which it is proved, by internal as well as by direct and satisfactory evidence, that they were written by the late Right Hon. Edmund Burke. By John Roche, Esq. an Honorary Member, and formerly President of the Royal Physical Society of Edinburgh, &c.
Page 21 - em they rise bang ! one's fated to die ; I bag it, and onward trot Dido and I. Thus brace after brace, For my aim's pretty true, I bag in a space That few sportsmen can do. With appetite keen To my box then I go, While the charms of the scene Set my heart in a glow. But hold in the stubble...
Page 45 - THE CHRISTIAN'S PATTERN: OR, A TREATISE OF THE IMITATION OF JESUS CHRIST. BY THOMAS A KEMPIS. TRANSLATED FROM THE LATIN BY DEAN STANHOPE. NEW AND REVISED EDITION.
Page 28 - Confusion we'll drink to ev'ry rogue's plan, And pledge it like able men. With a hob-nob, and a merry go round, And we'll pull in ere reason fail ; For the stoutest man in the kingdom found Must knock under to humming ale.
Page 39 - We tars have a maxim, your honour's, d'ye see, To live in the same way we fight ; We never give in, and when running a lee, We pipe hands the vessel to right. It may do for a lubber to snivel and that, If by chance on a shoal he be cast ; But a tar among breakers, or thrown on a flat, Fulls away, tug and tug to the last. With a yeo, yeo, yeo...
Page 15 - Love, little false urchin, advice didn't spare, Yet his arrows at random he shot 'em ; And a dart aim'd at prudence, who chanced to be there, But thus wounded, their hearts she forgot 'em. Left by prudence, the maids turn'd out silly, and so They often said yes, when they should have said no.
Page 21 - em they're set. I mark 'em they rise bang ! one's fated to die ; I bag it, and homeward trot Dido and I. Thus, brace after brace, For my aim's pretty true, I bag in a space That few sportsmen can do. With appetite keen, To my box then I go. While the charms of the scene Set my heart in a glow. But...
Page 17 - A little boy espied A butterfly one day ; To catch the prize he tried The insect got away. From flower to flower it flew, The hunter to elude ; He more impatient grew The longer he pursued. Pursuing pleasure if you try, 'Tis to chase the butterfly. The little eager boy The trifler followed up, Who buried, to his joy, Within a tulip's cup. The boy with all his power To seize the tulip flew ; His ardour crushed the flower, And kill'il the insect, too.
Page 17 - I am, ha, ha, ha ! [Exit laughing. Har. Now, in case of discovery, I am certain of protection here : perhaps my persecutor may follow me no longer; what happiness can he hope for? I never will be his, and should he again get me in his power, the breaking ray heart would foil all his hopes. Pleasure is his pursuit, a phantom for ever eluding its follower, and which, when secured, ceases to exist. BALLAD. HARRY. A little boy espied A butterfly one day ; To catch the prize he tried ; The insect got...

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