Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, 1868 - Gordon Riots, 1780 - 531 pages
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Review: Barnaby Rudge

User Review  - Paula - Goodreads

This was not my favorite Dickens novel. The eponomous character, Barnaby Rudge, was easy to sympathize with, but difficult to identify with. The female characters were among Dickens' most shallow ... Read full review

Review: Barnaby Rudge

User Review  - James - Goodreads

Barnaby Rudge is Charles Dickens' fifth novel and was his first historical work (A Tale of Two Cities to come later). It is maybe the least known and least successful of his books. Dickens originally ... Read full review

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Page 4 - When he had achieved his task, he applied himself to the acquisition of stable language, in which he soon became such an adept, that he would perch outside my window and drive imaginary horses with great skill, all day. Perhaps even I never saw him at his best, for his former master sent his duty with him, 'and if I wished the bird to come out very strong, would I be so good as to show him a drunken man' — which I never did, having (unfortunately) none but sober people at hand.
Page 4 - I never did, having (unfortunately) none but sober people at hand. But I could hardly have respected him more, whatever the stimulating influences of this sight might have been. He had not the least respect, I am sorry to say, for me in return, or for anybody but the cook ; to whom he was attached, but only, I fear, as a policeman might have been. Once, I met him unexpectedly about...
Page 328 - ... frightened people with their goods ; the reflections in every quarter of the sky, of deep red, soaring flames, as though the last day had come and the whole universe were burning; the dust, and smoke, and drift of fiery particles, scorching and kindling all it fell upon; the hot unwholesome vapour, the blight on everything; the stars, and moon, and very sky, obliterated; — made up such a sum of dreariness and ruin, that it seemed as if the face of Heaven were blotted out, and night, in its...
Page 267 - ... savages who twisted human necks. There were men who cast their lighted torches in the air, and suffered them to fall upon their heads and faces, blistering the skin with deep unseemly burns. There were men who rushed up to the fire, and paddled in it with their hands as if in water ; and others who were restrained by force from plunging in, to gratify their deadly longing. On the skull of one drunken lad — not twenty, by his looks— who lay upon the ground with a bottle to his mouth, the lead...

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