Howards End

Front Cover
Random House LLC, 1991 - Fiction - 359 pages
49 Reviews

First published in 1910, Howards End is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer.

At its heart lie two families--the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked--some very funny, some very tragic--that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes' charming country home.

As much about the clash between individual wills as the clash between the sexes and the classes, Howards End is a novel whose central tenet, "Only connect," remains a powerful prescription for modern life.

Introduction by Alfred Kazan

(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MickyFine - LibraryThing

Margaret and Helen Schlegel are idealistic, artistic, and seem to exist in a world untouched by the realities of the increasingly modern world in which the Wilcoxes thrive. When the lives of the ... Read full review

Review: Howards End

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

It's been a long time since I had a heroine with whom I identified as strongly as Meg Schlegel: young-ish but headed into spinster territory; interested in art and intellectual pursuits, but also ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
32
Section 4
47
Section 5
58
Section 6
75
Section 7
76
Section 8
82
Section 16
192
Section 17
202
Section 18
211
Section 19
216
Section 20
227
Section 21
244
Section 22
251
Section 23
255

Section 9
112
Section 10
120
Section 11
131
Section 12
144
Section 13
156
Section 14
164
Section 15
184
Section 24
303
Section 25
306
Section 26
317
Section 27
326
Section 28
345
Section 29
359
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Edward Morgan Forster was born on January 1, 1879, in London, England. He never knew his father, who died when Forster was an infant. Forster graduated from King's College, Cambridge, with B.A. degrees in classics (1900) and history (1901), as well as an M.A. (1910). In the mid-1940s he returned to Cambridge as a professor, living quietly there until his death in 1970. Forster was named to the Order of Companions of Honor to the Queen in 1953. Forster's writing was extensively influenced by the traveling he did in the earlier part of his life. After graduating from Cambridge, he lived in both Greece and Italy, and used the latter as the setting for the novels Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) and A Room with a View (1908). The Longest Journey was published in 1907. Howard's End was modeled on the house he lived in with his mother during his childhood. During World War I, he worked as a Red Cross Volunteer in Alexandria, aiding in the search for missing soldiers; he later wrote about these experiences in the nonfiction works Alexandria: A History and Guide and Pharos and Pharillon. His two journeys to India, in 1912 and 1922, resulted in A Passage to India (1924), which many consider to be Forster's best work; this title earned the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Forster wrote only six novels, all prior to 1925 (although Maurice was not published until 1971, a year after Forster's death, probably because of its homosexual theme). For much of the rest of his life, he wrote literary criticism (Aspects of the Novel) and nonfiction, including biographies (Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson), histories, political pieces, and radio broadcasts. Howard's End, A Room with a View, and A Passage to India have all been made into successful films.

Bibliographic information