Canadian Democracy: An Introduction

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Oxford University Press, 1996 - Mathematics - 398 pages
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Stephen Brooks' Canadian Democracy explores the complexities, characteristics, and controversies associated with this country's politics. The book introduces the reader to basic ideas, institutions, and the processes of Canadian politics and asks questions about the nature of Canadian democracy. While most Canadians believe that this is basically a democratic country, many would yet argue that the Canadian confederation is showing its age and is in need of a major overhaul, at least. Interest groups, women's organizations, Aboriginals, labour, and the poor - to name some of the most significant groups in Canadian society - might argue with some justification that Canadian democracy is failing them. Judging by the October 1995 referendum on sovereignty in Quebec, it seems that a sizeable majority of francophones feel the same way.

In this revised and updated second edition, Canadian Democracy views the current problems and possibilities of Canada's body politics in the context both of Canadian history and of the experience of other representative democracies. Brooks examines the societal context of politics, structures of governance such as constitution, parliament, executive federalism and the courts, political participation, and media influence. He considers, as well, important current issues in Canadian political life, including the impact of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, language politics and Quebec, and gender and politics. Key sections of Canada's constitution are included in appendices.

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Contents

An Introduction to Political Life
3
PART TWO THE SOCIETAL CONTEXT OF POLITICS Chapter 2 Ideological and Institutional Roots
25
List of Figures
47
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)


Stephen Brooks teaches in the Political Science Department at the University of Windsor. He has written several books on Canadian politics and government, including Public Policy in Canada.

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