The Court magazine and belle assemblée [afterw.] and monthly critic and the Lady's magazine and museum (Google eBook)

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1837
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Page 215 - And let those, that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question}: of the play be then to be considered : that's villainous ; and shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it.
Page 260 - The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage to Egypt, and that he lives in the days of Antony and Cleopatra. Surely he that imagines this may imagine more.
Page 239 - Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth, and youth, and warm desire ; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
Page 275 - NOT to admire, is all the art I know, To make men happy, and to keep them so.
Page 66 - s drunken, fiery face no less) Drinks up the sea, and when he's done, The moon and stars drink up the sun. They drink and dance by their own light, They drink and revel all the night. Nothing in Nature's sober found, But an eternal health goes round.
Page 217 - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave.
Page 260 - By supposition, as place is introduced, time may be extended; the time required by the fable elapses for the most part between the acts; for, of so much of the action as is represented, the real and poetical duration is the same.
Page 238 - May never was the month of love For May is full of flowers, But rather April, wet by kind, For love is full of showers.
Page 260 - Corneille, they have very generally received, by discovering that they have given more trouble to the poet than pleasure to the auditor. The necessity of observing the unities of time and place arises from the supposed necessity of making the drama credible.
Page 66 - THE thirsty earth soaks up the rain, And drinks, and gapes for drink again. The plants suck-in the earth, and are With constant drinking fresh and fair...

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