The Holy Roman Empire (Google eBook)

Front Cover
MacMillan Company, 1907 - Holy Roman Empire - 575 pages
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Contents

Relations of Eastern Empire and Church to the Barbarians 333 The Eastern Empire and the Orthodox Church
337
109
343
The Existence of the Eastern Empire affected but slightly
347
Why the Easterns did not idealize their Emperor 347 Character of the Intellect of the East Romans 350 Their History compared with that of the West
350
Loss of Imperial Territories 354 Gradual Change in the Germanic Constitution 359 Beginning of the Predominance of the Hapsburgs
361
Changes of Title in Germany
368
The Reformation and its Effects upon the Empire
371
Stint and Essence of the Religious Movement
377
Its Effect upon the Mediaeval Theory of the Empire
384
Hippolytus a Lapide and his Book
390
Condition of Germany after the Peace 394 The Balance of Power 397 The Hapsburg Emperors and their Policy 400 The Emperors Charles VII and J...
406
France and the French Empire
412
CHAPTER XXII
418
In how far was the Empire really Roman? 426
426
Influence of the Imperial System in Germany
435
CHAPTER XXIII
447
Character and Reign of Frederick the Great 453
453
Establishment of the Germanic Confederation
459
The Revolution of 18489
465
The SchleswigHolstein War
473
The North German Confederation
480
Structure of the Federal System
486
Cacses which have worked for the Cohesion of the Empire
493
How far the New Empire represents the Ancient Holy Empire
500
Additional Notes
513
APPENDIX
529
On Certain Imperial Titles and Ceremonies
535
Hildeberts Lines contrasting the Past and Present
542
139
562
296
567
77
569

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 114 - He shall judge the poor of the people, He shall save the children of the needy, And shall break in pieces the oppressor. 5 They shall fear thee as long as the sun and moon endure, Throughout all generations.
Page 11 - Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme; Or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evil doers, and for the praise of them that do well.
Page 405 - With unexpected legions bursts away, And sees defenceless realms receive his sway: Short sway ! fair Austria spreads her mournful charms, The queen, the beauty, sets the world, in arms...
Page 521 - Duo quippe sunt, imperator auguste, quibus principaliter mundus hic regitur: auctoritas sacrata pontificum et regalis potestas. In quibus tanto gravius est pondus sacerdotum, quanto etiam pro ipsis regibus hominum in divino reddituri sunt examine rationem.
Page 173 - Do and ordain whatsoever thou wilt, thy will is law; as it is written: ' Quicquid principi placuit legis habet vigorem, cum populus ei et in eum omne suum imperium et potestatem concesserit...
Page 181 - Emperor lies amid his knights in an enchanted sleep, waiting the hour when the ravens shall cease to hover round the peak, and the pear-tree blossom in the valley, to descend with his Crusaders and bring back to Germany the golden age of peace and strength and unity.
Page 9 - Huius pacificis debemus moribus omnes, quod veluti patriis regionibus utitur hospes ; quod sedem mutare licet ; quod cernere Thulen 2o lusus, et horrendos quondam penetrare recessus ; quod bibimus passim Rhodanum, potamus Orontem ; quod cuncti gens una sumus.
Page 19 - Romano nomine Romanum omne solum Gothorum imperium et faceret et vocaret essetque, ut vulgariter loquar, Gothia, quod Romania fuisset...
Page 497 - The permanence of an institution depends not merely on the material interests that support it, but on its conformity to the deeprooted sentiment of the men for whom it has been made. When it draws to itself and provides a fitting expression for that sentiment, the sentiment becomes thereby not only more vocal but actually stronger, and in its turn imparts a fuller vitality to the institution.
Page 75 - Jerusalem), with the earlier remains of our Saxon Edifices. Now the architecture of the Holy Land was Grecian, but greatly fallen from its ancient elegance. Our Saxon performance was indeed a bad copy of it ; and as much inferior to the works of St.

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