Network Design: Connectivity and Facilities Location : DIMACS Workshop, April 28-30, 1997

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Panos M. Pardalos, Dingzhu Du
American Mathematical Society, Jan 1, 1998 - Technology & Engineering - 461 pages
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Connectivity and facilities location are two important topics in network design, with applications in data communication, transportation, production planning, and VLSI designs. There are two issues concerning these topics: design and optimization. They involve combinatorial design and combinatorial optimization. This volume features talks presented at an interdisciplinary research workshop held at DIMACS in April 1997. The workshop was attended by leading theorists, algorithmists, and practitioners working on network design problems. Finding the solution of design problems and the optimal or approximate solution of the related optimization problem are challenging tasks because no polynomial time algorithms are known. Such problems include some variations of Steiner tree problems (such as multiple-connected Steiner network, independent flow problem, and subset-interconnection designs), topology network design, nonlinear assignment problems (such as quadratic assignment problems), problems in facilities location and allocation, and network problems appearing in VLSI design. The focus of this book is on combinatorial, algorithmic, and applicational aspects of these problems. The volume would be suitable as a textbook for advanced courses in computer science, mathematics, engineering, and operations research.

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About the author (1998)

Panos M. Pardalos is one of the leading experts in global optimization and control theory. V. Yatsenko's research is connected with control of bilinear systems, nonlinear estimation, control of quantum systems, and globabl optimization problems. Both Pardalos and Yatsenko have authored numerous publications including books and well-known scientific journals.

DING-ZHU DU, PhD, is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Minnesota.

KER-I KO, PhD, is Professor of Computer Science at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The two are also coauthors of Theory of Computational Complexity (Wiley).

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