Little Witch's Bad Dream

Front Cover
Random House, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 48 pages
3 Reviews
Little Witch is back, and this time she's mad! At her cousin Bossy, that is. Cousin Bossy has come for a visit and makes Little Witch feel as if she can't do anything right. When Little Witch has had enough, she dreams of turning her magic on Cousin Bossy--and turning her into a stinking pile of garbage. But is it all a dream? Readers will enjoy finding out when they read this great new addition to the Little Witch series.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AbigailAdams26 - LibraryThing

Little Witch returns in this fourth beginning-reader from Deborah Hautzig, once again finding that her sweet and helpful ways are a source of irritation for her impatient mother. When Cousin Bossy ... Read full review

Review: Little Witch's Bad Dream (Little Witch #4)

User Review  - Miri - Goodreads

Little Witch's cousin Bossy is coming to visit, Little Witch is excited and starts preparing things for her stay, making things extra nice, but when Bossy arrives, nothing is good enough for her, she even brings her own food. Little witch is soon desperate for Bossy to leave! Read full review

Contents

Section 1
iv
Section 2
42
Section 3
46
Copyright

About the author (2000)

Deborah Hautzig was born in New York City and grew up on the Upper West Side. She graduated from the Chapin School and published Hey, Dollface, her first novel, in 1978 while still a student at Sarah Lawrence College. Her second novel, Second Star to the Right, was a National Book Award finalist in 1982 and is still in paperback. She is the author of dozens of children's books, including nine books about Little Witch, a character she created and which made its debut in 1984; eighteen highly regarded retellings of classic fairy tales and stories; thirty-three Sesame Street books, as well as many other well-known titles. She has also written book reviews for The New York Times and contributed to poetry collections. She lives in New York City with her husband and their fourteen-year-old daughter.

Wickstrom grew up in France and never heard of cups, pints, and quarts until she came to the U.S.

Bibliographic information