An Universal History, from the Earliest Account of Time, Volume 61 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
T. Osborne, 1763 - World history
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 421 - But since the natives of that place, who will be concerned in our plantation, are utterly strangers to Christianity, whose idolatry, ignorance, or mistake, gives us no right to expel, or use them ill; and those who remove from other parts to plant there, will unavoidably be of different opinions concerning matters of religion, the liberty whereof they will expect to have allowed them...
Page 366 - Majesty, in that part of the world, shall be fixed irrevocably by a line drawn along the middle of the River Mississippi, from its source...
Page 366 - France, in its whole breadth and length, from its source to the sea, and expressly that part, which is between the said island of New Orleans, and the right bank of that River, as well as the passage both in and out of its mouth...
Page 249 - Majesty, in full right, Canada, with all its dependencies, as well as the island of Cape Breton, and all the other islands and coasts in the gulph and river of St.
Page 232 - By the list of disabled officers, many of whom are of rank, you may perceive, Sir, that the army is much weakened. By the nature of the river, the most formidable part of this armament is deprived of the power of acting : yet we have almost the whole force of Canada to oppose. In this situation there is such a choice of difficulties that I own myself at a loss how to determine. The affairs of Great Britain I know require the most...
Page 455 - Trustees' cattle. The river is pretty wide, the water fresh, and from the key of the town you see its whole course to the sea, with the island of...
Page 232 - Neither one nor other of these advantages can any where else be found. The Enemy were indeed posted upon a commanding Eminence - The beach upon which the troops were drawn up, was of deep mud, with holes, and cut by several...
Page 249 - King cedes and makes over the whole to the said King, and to the Crown of Great Britain, and that in the most ample manner and form, without restriction, and without any liberty to depart from the said cession, and guaranty under any pretence, or to disturb Great Britain in the possessions above mentioned.
Page 250 - Majesty, and bring away their effects as well as their persons, without being restrained in their emigration, under any pretence whatsoever, except that of debts or of criminal prosecutions : The term limited for this emigration shall be fixed to the space of eighteen months, to be computed from the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty.
Page 238 - Lordship the Bishop of Quebec, who, animated with zeal for religion, and charity for the people of his diocese, desires to reside...

Bibliographic information