The Geographical, Natural and Civil History of Chili: The civil history of Chili (Google eBook)

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I. Riley, 1808 - Natural history
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Page ii - POMEROY, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as Proprietor, in the words following, to wit: "Biography of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence.
Page 91 - The Watchandies seeing me much interested in the genus Eucalyptus soon composed a song on this subject." The Fuegians are fond of music and generally sing in their boats, doubtless keeping time, as many primitive peoples do. " The principal subject of the songs of the Araucanians is the exploits of their heroes:" when at work their "song was simple, referring mostly to their labour...
Page 8 - Crush'd as we are by fortune's cruel stroke, And bent beneath an ignominious yoke, 111 can our minds such noble pride maintain, While the fierce Spaniard holds our galling chain. Your generous fury here ye vainly show; Ah! rather pour it on th
Page 4 - In describing the Chilians, MOLINA says, "Their complexion, like that of the other American nations, is of a reddish brown, but it is of a clearer hue, and readily changes to white. A tribe, who dwell in the province of Baroa, are of a clear white and red, without any intermixture of the copper colour.
Page 108 - Leibnitz asserts is true, that men have never discovered greater talents than in the invention of the different kinds of games, the Araucanians may justly claim the merit of not being in this respect inferior to other nations. Their games are very numerous, and for the most part very ingenious ; they are divided into the sedentary and gymnastic. It is a curious fact, and worthy of notice, that among the first is the game of chess, which they call comican, and which has been known to them from time...
Page 8 - Now prompts that counsel which you'll find the best. Why should we now for marks of glory jar ? Why wish to spread our martial name afar ? Crushed as we are by Fortune's cruel stroke, And bent beneath an ignominious yoke, 111 can our minds such noble pride maintain, While the fierce Spaniard holds our galling chain. Your generous fury here ye vainly show; Ah! rather pour it on th...
Page 9 - Leader still our present state demands, To guide to vengeance our impatient bands; Fit for this hardy task that Chief I deem, Who longest may sustain a massive beam: Your rank is equal, let your force be tried And for the strongest let his strength decide.
Page 137 - There was not a family but had the loss of some relation to deplore. The alarm was greatly heightened by the news of the near approach of Lautaro. Villagran, who thought it impossible to defend the city, embarked precipitately the old men, the women and the children, on board of two ships that were then fortunately in the harbour, with orders to the captains to conduct part of them to Imperial, and part to Valparaiso ; while with the rest of the inhabitants he proceeded by land to Santiago.
Page 64 - Poet consoles her ; dresses her wound, and leaves one of his attendants to protect her. CANTO XXXIII. ONE of the prisoners, whom the Spaniards had taken in their search after Caupolican, is at last tempted by bribes to betray his General. He conducts the Spaniards to a spot near the sequestered retreat of this unfortunate Chief, and directs them how to discover it ; but refuses to advance with them, overcome by his dread of the Hero whom he is tempted to betray.
Page 282 - In the first twenty-three or twenty-four ships of five or six hundred tons each are employed, which are "partly Chilian and partly Peruvian. These usually make three voyages in a year ; they carry from Chili wheat, wine, pulse, almonds, nuts, cocoa-nuts, conserves, dried meat, tallow, lard, cheese, sole leather, timber for building, copper, and a variety of other articles, and bring back in return silver, sugar, rice and cotton. . The Spanish ships receive in exchange for European merchandise gold,...

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