The Argosy (Google eBook)

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Strahan & Company - English literature
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Page 436 - They say, it is, better to stand than to walk; better to sit than to stand; better to lie down than to sit; better to sleep than to be awake; and death is best of all.
Page 395 - Signor, non sotto l' ombra in piaggia molle , Tra fonti e fior, tra Ninfe e tra Sirene; Ma in cima all' erto e faticoso colle Della virt¨ , riposto Ŕ il nostro bene. Chi non gela e non suda , e non s' estolle Dalle vie del piacer, lÓ non perviene.
Page 393 - The good old rule, The simple plan, That he shall take who has the power, And he shall keep who can.
Page 220 - Forgive my grief for one removed, Thy creature, whom I found so fair. I trust he lives in thee, and there I find him worthier to be loved.
Page 436 - Again, many tourists are slaves of their clothes, and are too anxious about bag and baggage to enjoy anything. We once travelled with an old bachelor who was much disappointed with the Alps. Why \ He saw them not ! for he was thinking of, and boring us about, those pills he had forgotten at Paris ! Nor should we think back, in a remorseful way, on sights we have missed. " Things without all remedy should be without regret.
Page 79 - A party sued for the reward promised by advertisement to any person who would give such information as would lead to the conviction of those concerned in a burglary in his...
Page 33 - ... the place then, and were quite safe and comfortable ; whilst in the valley below there were two cows and a milkmaid killed." Again De Courcy remonstrated, uselessly ; for there was not one willing to descend the hill with him, and brave the fury of the storm : so they gathered themselves together in Lady Harcourt's Tower. Their situation was appalling enough. Perched on the summit of one of the highest of the Malvern Hills, the valley beneath them appeared, in the distance, as if it were miles...
Page 15 - He raised his hat as he looked at her : and, in the space of a minute, all trace of them, save the dust, was gone. She shut down the window; she leaned her throbbing temples upon her hands ; she gave vent to all the fierce jealousy that was raging within her. Never, never, she told herself in her passion, should her thoughts revert to that man again, save with scorn. And yet, the next minute, she caught herself indulging in a fantastic hope that he might come, even that evening, when his drive was...
Page 241 - ... his letters were always placed, an envelope with his name written across it. Being the most careless of men he never noticed the " AT" written above, tore open the envelope, flung it behind him, and to his surprise, found in his hands a card, bearing on it a gracefully-executed bunch of primroses, while underneath was pencilled in a lady's hand : " In the spring a young man's fancy, Lightly turns to thoughts oflove.
Page 67 - ... He jest hooked to my elbow, and without sayin' another word, we marveled for hum. "Sence that, I hain't held no communion with petticoats, and ef I ever get married, you shall hev an invite to the funeral." As I went home that night, my boy, after hearing the story of that rude, unlettered man, I made up my mind to have nothing more to do with the uncertain women of America, until my position should bo such that they would not dare to "fool

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