The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of George the Third: 1760-1860, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Crosby and Nichols, 1862 - Constitutional history
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Page 418 - ... a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole ; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole.
Page 392 - Johnson long afterwards owned that, though he had saved appearances, he had taken care that the Whig dogs should not have the best of it...
Page 418 - But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you; to any man, or to any set of men living.
Page 135 - ... in order to prevent any mistake for the future, shortly to explain what it is she expects from her Foreign Secretary. She requires: 1. That he will distinctly state what he proposes in a given case, in order that the Queen may know as distinctly to what she has given her Royal sanction. 2. Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister.
Page 424 - That the power of publishing such of its reports, votes, and proceedings as it shall deem necessary or conducive to the public interests is an essential incident to the constitutional functions of parliament, more especially of this house as the representative portion of it.
Page 462 - LORD, from the evil man ; and preserve me from the wicked man ; 2 Who imagine mischief in their hearts, and stir up strife all the day long. 3 They have sharpened their tongues like a serpent; adder's poison is under their lips.
Page 453 - Opera), the best farce (the Critic it is only too good for a farce), and the best Address (Monologue on Garrick), and, to crown all, delivered the very best Oration (the famous Begum Speech) ever conceived or heard in this country.
Page 67 - That it is now necessary to declare, that to report any opinion, or pretended opinion of his Majesty upon any bill or other proceeding depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the Constitution of this country.
Page 453 - ... whatever the acuteness of the bar, the dignity of the senate, or the morality of the pulpit, could furnish, had not been equal to what that House had that day heard in Westminster Hall.
Page 180 - ... by his command, signified by word of mouth, the royal signature by means of a stamp. In order to prevent the possibility of any abuse of this power, it was provided that the stamp should not be affixed to any instrument, unless a memorandum describing its object had been indorsed upon it, signed by the Lord Chancellor, the President of the Council, the Lord Privy Seal, the First Lord of the Treasury, and the Secretaries of State, or any three of them. The seal was directed to be kept in the custody...

References from web pages

JSTOR: The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession ...
BOOK REVIEWS 641 The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of George the Third. By SIR THOMAS ERSKINE MAY. Edited and continued to 1911 by ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0003-0554(191211)6%3A4%3C641%3ATCHOES%3E2.0.CO%3B2-R

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