Olympic Politics

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Manchester University Press, 1996 - Sports & Recreation - 283 pages
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This comprehensively rewritten and updated edition investigates the politics behind a hundred years of Olympic history, from Baron de Coubertin's revival of the games to Atlanta in 1996. Christopher R. Hill begins by explaining why politics have always been central to the Olympic movement, and by investigating who holds power within it, how it is financed and how the costly process of bidding for the games works. He then covers the Olympics' recent history: the Cold War games of Moscow 1980 and Los Angles 1984; Seoul 1988, a highly successful PR exercise by the Korean government: and Barcelona 1992, arguably the most commercial and televisual games in history. A major new section covers the story of the South Africa's exclusion from the Olympics which ended in 1992, and there is also coverage of the background to Atlanta's successful bid and preparations. The book finishes by asking where the Olympic movement is heading, and whether 'gigantism', both in terms of the scale of the games and the movement's sense of its own importance, threaten its future.
  

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Olympic politics

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The author's thesis is not original to anyone who follows sport. The Olympic movement, Hill (politics, Univ. of York) argues, has been transformed into a major business dominated by money, power, and ... Read full review

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Contents

Introduction
1
The primacy of politics in the Olympic movement
34
Power and authority in the Olympic movement
60
Financing the Games
75
The Moscow Games of 1980
118
The Los Angeles Games of 1984
138
The Seoul Games of 1988
161
The Barcelona Games of 1992
181
The Olympics in the third millennium
247
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