The Cambridge History of American Literature: Volume 6, Prose Writing, 1910-1950

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Sacvan Bercovitch, Cyrus R. K. Patell
Cambridge University Press, Nov 28, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 640 pages
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Volume 6 of The Cambridge History of American Literature explores the emergence and flowering of modernism in the Untied States. David Minter provides a cultural history of the American novel from World War I to the Great Depression, Rafia Zafar tells the story of the Harlem Renaissance, and Werner Sollors examines canonical texts as well as hitherto unknown immigrant writing. Taken together these narratives cover the entire range of literary prose written in the first half of the twentieth century.
  

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Contents

A Dream City Lyric Years and a Great War
10
Confidence and Uncertainity in The Portrait of a Lady
15
Lines of Expansion
23
Four Contemporaries and the Closing of the West
34
Chicagos Dream City
37
Frederick Jackson Turner in the Dream City
43
Henry Adamss Education and the Grammar of Progress
48
Jack Londons Career and Popular Discourse
57
Black Manhattan
289
Avatars and Manifestos
295
Harlem as a State of Mind Hughes McKay Toomer
306
A New Negro A New Woman Larsen Fauset Bonner
317
DarkSkinned Selves Without Fear or Shame Thurman and Nugent
326
Genre in the Renaissance Fisher Schuyler Cullen White Bontemps
332
Southern Daugher Native Son Hurston and Wright
340
Black Modernism
348

Innocence and Revolt in the Lyric Years 19001916
63
The Armory Show of 1913 and the Decline of Innocence
71
The Play of Hope and Despair
77
The Great War and the Fate of Writing
89
Fiction in a Time of Plenty
102
The Jazz Age and the Lost Generation Revisited
108
The Perils of Plenty or How the Twenties Acquired a Paranoid Tilt
125
Disenchantment Flight and the Rise of Professionalism in an Age of Plenty
134
Class Power and Violence in a New Age
142
The Fear of Feminization and the Logic of Modest Ambition
151
Marginality and AuthorityRace Gender and Religion
160
War as Metaphor The Example of Ernest Hemingway
170
The fate of writing during the Great Depression
184
The Search for Culture as a Form of Commitment
190
Three Responses The Examples of Henry Miller Djuna Barnes and John Dos Passos
200
Residual Invidualism and Hedged Commitments
208
The Search for Shared Purpose Struggles on the Left
225
Documentary Literature and the Disarming of Dissent
241
The Southern Renaissance Forms of Reaction and Innovation
250
History and NovelsNovels and History The Example of William Faulkner
266
FICTIONS OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE
283
A New Negro?
285
ETHNIC MODERNISM
353
Introduction
355
Gertrude Stein and Negro Sunshine
368
Ethnic Lives and Lifelets
384
Ethnic Themes Modern Themes
405
Mary Antin Progressive Optimism
411
Who Is American?
422
American Languages
428
All The Past We Leave Behind? Ole E Rölvaag and the Immigrant Trilogy
434
Modernism Ethnic Labeling and the Quest for Wholeness Jean Toomers New American Race
442
Freud Marx HardBoiled
452
Hemingway Spoken Here
465
Henry Roth Ethnicity Modernity and Modernism
475
The Clock the Salesman and the Breast
490
Was Modernism Antitotalitarian
512
Facing the Extreme
539
Grand Central Terminal
552
Chronology
557
Bibliograph
597
Index
605
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Sacvan Bercovitch, who is a professor at Harvard University, is probably the most influential critic in American studies today. Tracing the function of rhetoric in American writing from the Puritans through the nineteenth century, Bercovitch has argued that the persuasiveness of rhetoric is in proportion to its capacity to help people act in history. In his books, Bercovitch has revealed the power of American rhetoric as it creates a myth of America that conflates religious and political issues, transforming even the most despairing and critical energies into affirmations of the American way. Among his major arguments is the idea that the rhetoric of America's colonial sermons and histories, founding documents, such as the Declaration of Independence, and novels of the American Renaissance, all participate in the project of transforming what he calls dissensus into rituals of consensus.

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