... Pacific Coast: Coast Pilot of California, Oregon, and Washington Territory (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1869 - Pilot guides - 262 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - ... came principally from the shore, brought with it a very strong smell of burning tar, or of some such resinous substance.
Page 26 - ... tar, or of some such resinous substance. The next morning the sea had the appearance of dissolved tar floating upon its surface, which covered the ocean in all directions within the limits of our view, and indicated that in the neighbourhood it was not subject to much agitation.
Page 107 - He" (Mr. Whitworth), Carver says " designed to have pursued nearly the same route that I did ; and after having built a fort at Lake Pepin, to have proceeded up the River St. Pierre, and from thence up a branch of the River Messorie* till, having discovered the source of the Oregon or River of the West, on the other side of the lands that divide the waters which run into the Gulf of Mexico from those that fall into the Pacific Ocean...
Page 107 - Messorie* till, having discovered the source of the Oregon or River of the West, on the other side of the lands that divide the waters which run into the Gulf of Mexico from those that fall into the Pacific Ocean, he would have sailed down that river to the place where it is said to empty itself, near the Straits of A.nian...
Page 1 - Know ye that California lies on the right hand of the Indies, very near to the terrestrial paradise.
Page 77 - Another reason which induced the Capitana to put into Puerto Francisco was to take a survey of it, and to see if anything was to be found of the San Augustin, which in the year 1595, had, by order of his majesty and the viceroy, been sent from the Philippines by the governor to survey the coast of California, under the direction of Sebastian Rodriguez Cermennon, a pilot of known abilities; but was driven ashore in this harbor by the violence of the wind.
Page 133 - E. from us at noon. At the northern extreme the land formed a point, which I called Cape Foulweather, from the very bad weather that we soon after met with. I judge it to lie in the latitude of 44* 55' N., and in the longitude of 235 54
Page 74 - There is no part of earth here to be taken up, wherein there is not some probable show of gold or silver.
Page 156 - Point Adams, had been cut through about midway between the point and their western extremity by a wide channel with deep water running south by west from Sand Island: but the bar of this channel was not fairly opened, there being less than 3 fathoms on it. This channel was, therefore, running at right angles to that of 1841 and over the spot marked bare in 1839 (* C.
Page 183 - Indians and settlers set fire to the forests in every direction, and the country soon becomes enveloped in a vast smoke that lasts for two or three months. At such times it is frequently impossible to make out the shore at half a mile distance. The strong westerly winds coming up the strait disperse it for a while, but only to fan the fires, and give them renewed force and activity. In summer the prevailing wind draws into the strait, increasing towards evening...

Bibliographic information