The History of Massachusetts ...: The commonwealth period [1775-1820 (Google eBook)

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Phillips, Sampson, 1857 - Massachusetts
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Page 384 - Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor or caprice?
Page 115 - The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.
Page 416 - No person who shall hereafter be naturalized, shall be eligible as a member of the senate or house of representatives of the United States, nor capable of holding any civil office under the authority of the United States.
Page 87 - With respect to myself, I have never entertained an idea of an accommodation, since I heard of the measures, which were adopted in consequence of the Bunker's Hill fight The King's speech has confirmed the sentiments I entertained upon the news of that affair; and, if every man was of my mind, the ministers of Great Britain should know, in a few words, upon what issue the cause should be put...
Page 115 - You will think me transported with enthusiasm ; but I am not. I am well aware of the toil, and blood, and treasure, that it will cost us to maintain this declaration, and support and defend these states.
Page 217 - Say not thou. What is the cause that the former days were better than these ? for thou dost not inquire wisely concerning this.
Page 122 - Set honour in one eye, and death i' the other, And I will look on both indifferently ; For, let the gods so speed me as 1 love The name of honour more than I fear death.
Page 304 - All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external happiness of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity.
Page 70 - Could I have foreseen what I have experienced, and am likely to experience, no consideration upon earth should have induced me to accept this command.
Page 304 - The establishment of our new government seemed to be the last great experiment for promoting human happiness by a reasonable compact in civil society. It was to be in the first instance, in a considerable degree, a government of accommodation as well as a government of laws. Much was to be done by prudence, much by conciliation, much by firmness.

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