The Miscellaneous Poems of William Wordsworth: In Four Volumes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1820 - English poetry - 328 pages
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Page 41 - Wisdom and Spirit of the universe ! Thou Soul that art the eternity of thought, That givest to forms and images a breath And everlasting motion, not in vain By day or star-light thus from my first dawn Of childhood didst thou intertwine for me The passions that build up our human soul ; Not with the mean and vulgar works of man, But with high objects, with enduring things— With life and nature — purifying thus The elements of feeling and of thought, And sanctifying, by such discipline, Both pain...
Page 3 - My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began ; So is it now I am a man ; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The child is father of the man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.
Page 181 - She dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A Maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love : A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye! Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be; But she is in her grave, and oh, The difference to me!
Page 202 - The youth of green savannahs spake, And many an endless, endless lake, With all its fairy crowds Of islands, that together lie As quietly as spots of sky Among the evening clouds. "How pleasant...
Page 215 - No Spectre greets me, — no vain Shadow this; Come, blooming Hero, place thee by my side! Give, on this well-known couch, one nuptial kiss To me, this day, a second time thy bride!
Page 16 - I —Yet some maintain that to this day She is a living child ; That you may see sweet Lucy Gray Upon the lonesome wild. O'er rough and smooth she trips along, And never looks behind ; And sings a solitary song That whistles in the wind.
Page 18 - I met a little cottage Girl : She was eight years old, she said ; Her hair was thick with many a curl That clustered round her head.
Page 15 - The wretched parents all that night Went shouting far and wide; But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. At day-break on a hill they stood That overlooked the moor; And thence they saw the bridge of wood, A furlong from their door. They wept — and, turning homeward, cried, "In heaven we all shall meet;" — When in the snow the mother spied The print of Lucy's feet.
Page 316 - And, as his Father had requested, laid The first stone of the Sheepfold. At the sight...
Page 42 - mid the calm of summer nights, When, by the margin of the trembling lake, Beneath the gloomy hills, homeward I went In solitude, such intercourse was mine : Mine was it in the fields both day and night, And by the waters, all the summer long...

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