Gordon McComb's Gadgeteer's Goldmine!: 55 Space-age Projects

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McGraw Hill Professional, 1990 - Technology & Engineering - 406 pages
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Gordon McComb's Gadgeteer's Goldmine is one of the most exciting, well-rounded collections of electronic projects available anywhere, featuring experiments in everything from magnetic levitation and lasers to high-tech surveillance and digital commuications. Hobbyists and garage-shop tinkerers will find instructions for building such useful items as a fiberoptic communications link, portable He-Ne laser pistol, laser alarm system, ultrasonic pest deterrent, solar batter recharger, wireless sound transimitter. IBM PC control interface, and many others.

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When I was just a child I found this book at the public library and then my grandfather bought me my own copy. It's what got me started in electronics and eventually made me rich. This text is intensely sentimental to me because of this. The maker renaissance may make books like this popular again.  

Contents

Introduction to highvoltage devices
1
Build a Jacobs ladder
9
Jacobs ladder
11
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Gordon McComb is an avid electronics hobbyist who has written for TAB Books for a number of years. He wrote the best-selling "Troubleshooting and Repairing VCRs" (now in its third edition), "Gordon McComb's Gadgeteer's Goldmine, " and "Lasers, Ray Guns, and Light Cannons."

Myke Predko has 20 years experience in the design, manufacturing, and testing of electronic circuits. An experienced author, Myke wrote McGraw-Hill's best-selling "123 Robotics Projects for the Evil Genius; 123 PIC Microcontroller Experiments for the Evil Genius, PIC Microcontroller Pocket Reference; Programming and Customizing PIC Microcontrollers, " Second Edition; "Programming Robot Controllers;" and other books, and is the principal designer of both "TAB Electronics Build Your Own Robot Kits.

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