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Books Books 1 - 10 of 58 on We are conscious automata, endowed with free will in the only intelligible sense....  
" We are conscious automata, endowed with free will in the only intelligible sense of that much-abused term inasmuch as in many respects we are able to do as we like but none the less parts of the great series of causes and effects which, in unbroken... "
Principles of mental physiology: with their applications to the training and ... - Page xlviii
by William Benjamin Carpenter - 1883 - 737 pages
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Christian Reformer, Volume 1

Religion - 1886
...to any common measure with material changes. When Professor Huxley, in his Belfast lecture, spoke of man as nothing but " a part of the great series of...has been, and shall be the sum of existence," I have no doubt that he expressed Mr. Herbert Spencer's conviction as well as his own. Now, what seems...
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The Contemporary Review, Volume 25

1875
...in the prosecution of this aim we have ourselves no voice whatever; since we are nothing but " parts of the great series of causes and effects, which,...has been, and shall be the sum of existence." Into such high philosophy I do not care to enter. It is like the " lunar politics " of Professor Huxley...
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The Living Age, Volume 124

1875
...much-abused term inasmuch as in many respects we are able to do as we like but none the less parts of the great series of causes and effects which, in...and has been, and shall be the sum of existence. As to the logical consequences of this conviction of mine, I may be permitted to remark that logical...
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The Contemporary Review, Volume 26

Great Britain - 1875
...but, nevertheless" (inasmuch as our likings are not really, at bottom, of our own making), " parts of the great series of causes and effects which, in...has been, and shall be the sum of existence." This is perfectly intelligible. We may admire or abhor the picture of ourselves which is thus presented...
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The Causational and Free Will Theories of Volition: Being a Review of Dr ...

Malcolm Guthrie - Causation - 1877 - 106 pages
...less parts of the same great series of causes and effects which, in unbroken continuity, comprises that which is, and has been, and shall be the sum of existence." (Huxley, Fortnightly Review, p. 577, 1874.) I cannot say that I quite understand what is meant...
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The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 28; Volume 91

1878
...mechanical forces or energies. Man, being the product of mechanical force, can only represent a unit in ' the great series of causes and effects which, in unbroken...and has been, and shall be, the sum of existence. ' \ In fine, he is a machine, an automaton, with no more real control over his actions than has the...
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The Realistic Assumptions of Modern Science Examined

Thomas Martin Herbert - Consciousness - 1879 - 460 pages
...in any region of the universe within reach of our powers. If we become part, then everything becomes part of ' the great series of causes 'and effects...has been, and shall be the sum of ' existence.' Therefore our contention that physical science, finding no evidence of volition or of consciousness...
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The realistic assumptions of modern science examined [ed. by J.M. Hodgson].

Thomas Martin Herbert - 1879
...in any region of the universe within reach of our powers. If we become part, then everything becomes part of ' the great series of causes ' and effects...has been, and shall be the sum of ' existence.' Therefore our contention that physical science, finding no evidence of volition or of consciousness...
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Science and Culture: And Other Essays

Thomas Henry Huxley - Science - 1881 - 349 pages
...much-abused term inasmuch as in many respects we are able to do as we like but none the less parts of the great series of causes and effects which, in...and has been, and shall be the sum of existence. As to the logical consequences of this conviction of mine, I may be permitted to remark that logical...
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The science of man

Charles Bray - 1883
...Professor Huxley says that in many respects we are able to do as we like, but are none the less parts of the great series of causes and effects, which,...and has been, and shall be the sum of existence. I quite agree with this, but that continuity would be broken were we to leave Mind the strongest...
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