Orthophony, Or, The Cultivation of the Voice, in Elocution: A Manual of Elementary Exercises, Adapted to Dr. Rush's "Philosophy of the Human Voice," and the System of Vocal Culture Introduced by Mr. James E. Murdoch : Designed as an Introduction to Russell's "American Elocutionist" (Google eBook)

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Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1851 - Elocution - 300 pages
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Page 238 - And when he came to himself, he said. How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare ; and I perish with hunger. I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him. Father, I have sinned against heaven and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son ; make me as one of thy hired servants.
Page 198 - Therefore it is of faith, that it might be by grace ; to the end the promise might be sure to all the seed ; not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham ; who is the father of us all...
Page 284 - There is a just God, who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone: it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave.
Page 171 - mong Graemes of the Netherby clan ; Forsters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they ran : There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee, But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see. So daring in love, and so dauntless in war, Have ye e'er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?
Page 270 - Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders. This many summers in a sea of glory ; But far beyond my depth ; my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me.
Page 275 - When my eyes shall be turned to behold, for the last time, the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious union ; on states dissevered, discordant, belligerent ; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood...
Page 116 - It must be so Plato, thou reasonest well ; Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man...
Page 125 - Hell from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming: it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations.
Page 275 - Liberty first, and Union afterwards, but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart, Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable.
Page 244 - Thou shalt lie down With patriarchs of the infant world, with kings, The powerful of the earth, the wise, the good, Fair forms, and hoary seers of ages past, All in one mighty sepulchre.

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