Communicative Action: Essays on Jürgen Habermas's The Theory of Communicative Action

Front Cover
Axel Honneth, Hans Joas
MIT Press, 1991 - Philosophy - 301 pages
0 Reviews
These critical essays on Jurgen Habermas's major contribution to sociological theory, The Theory of Communicative Action, provide an indispensable guide for anyone trying to grasp that large, difficult, and important work.

The editors' introduction traces the history of the reception of the work and identifies the main themes on which discussion has focused: a concept of communicative rationality; a theory of action based on distinguishing communicative from instrumental reason; a two-level concept of society that integrates lifeworld and system paradigms; and a critical theory of modernity meant to diagnose the sociopathologies of contemporary society.

Axel Honneth is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Berlin. Hans Joas is Professor of Sociology at the Free University, Berlin.

Contributors: Jeffrey Alexander. Johann P. Arnason. Johannes Berger. Gunter Dux. Jurgen Habermas. Hans Joas. Hans-Peter Kruger. Thomas McCarthy. Herbert Schnadelbach. Martin Seel. Charles Taylor.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Transformation of Critical Theory
7
Language and Society
23
Remarks
36
Beyond the Marxian
49
On the Reconstruction
74
The Unhappy Marriage of Hermeneutics and Functionalism
97
or the Seducements of Systems
119
Communicative Action or the Mode of Communication for
140
The Linguistification of the Sacred and the Delinguistification
165
Modernity as Project and as Field of Tensions
181
A Reply
214
Bibliographical Note
265
Index
295
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1991)

Axel Honneth is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Konstanz.

Hans Joas is Permanent Fellow at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies and Professor of Sociology and Social Thought at the University of Chicago.

Bibliographic information