Massachusetts in the Army and Navy During the War of 1861-65, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Wright & Potter, 1896 - Massachusetts
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Page 153 - ... by grief; exultant memories of the great and final victories of our country, our Union, and the righteous cause ; thankful memories of a deliverance wrought out for human nature itself, unexampled by any former achievement of arms ; immortal memories with immortal honors blended, twine around these splintered staves, weave themselves along the warp and woof of these familiar flags, war-worn, begrimed, and baptized with blood. "Let the 'brave heart, the trusty heart, the deep, unfathomable...
Page 153 - ... the courage and constancy shown, that the nation might live. It is, sir, a peculiar satisfaction and pleasure to us, that you, who have been an honor to the State and nation, from your marked patriotism and fidelity throughout the war, and have been identified with every organization before 'you, are now here to receive back, as the State custodian of her precious relics, these emblems of the devotion of her sons. May it please your Excellency, the colors of the Massachusetts volunteers are returned...
Page 153 - State who intrusted them to our keeping. You must, however, pardon us if we give them up with profound regret; for these tattered shreds forcibly remind us of long and fatiguing marches, cold bivouacs, and many hard-fought battles. The rents in their folds, the battle-stains on their escutcheons, the...
Page 153 - Proud memories of many a field; sweet memories alike of valor and friendship ; sad memories of fraternal strife; tender memories of our fallen brothers and sons, whose dying eyes looked last upon their flaming folds; grand memories of heroic virtues...
Page 93 - It is with heartfelt satisfaction, that the Commanding General announces to the army, that the operations of the last three days have determined that our enemy must either ingloriously fly, or come out from behind his defences, and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him.
Page 82 - That every white person, being a commissioned officer, or acting as such, who, during the present war, shall command Negroes or mulattoes in arms against the Confederate States, or who shall arm, train, organize, or prepare Negroes or mulattoes for military service against the Confederate States, or who shall voluntarily aid Negroes or mulattoes in any military enterprise, attack, or conflict in such service, shall be deemed as inciting servile insurrection, and shall, if captured, be put to death...
Page 27 - Immediately," he writes to President Lincoln on the 3d of May, "on receiving your Proclamation, we took up the war, and have carried on our part of it, in the spirit in which we believe the administration and the American people intend to act; namely, as if there was not an inch of red tape in the world.
Page 28 - Let me earnestly recommend to you, therefore, to call for no more than eight regiments, of which six only are to serve for three years, or during the war, and, if more are already called for, to reduce the number by discharge.
Page 131 - The land armament, with palisades and torpedoes, had been destroyed. For the first time in the history of sieges the land defences of the works were destroyed, not by the act of the besieging army, but by the concentrated fire, direct and enfilading, of an immense fleet, poured upon them without intermission, until torpedo wires were cut, palisades breached so that they actually afforded cover for assailants, and the slopes of the work were rendered practicable for assault.
Page 82 - ... shall, if captured, be put to death, or be otherwise punished at the discretion of the court.

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