Loving a woman in two worlds

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Dial Press, Jul 9, 1985 - Family & Relationships - 78 pages
4 Reviews
In this new collection of poems, the National Book Award-winning poet explores the meaning of mature love in a sustained meditation on faithfulness, on the sustenance of intimacy, and on grief as the door to deep emotion

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Review: Loving a Woman in Two Worlds

User Review  - Nicholas - Goodreads

No individual poems stood out, but overall Bly's short 4 line poems, showing a quick image and functioning like long haikus, are the highlights here. Longer poems all tend to have a line or two that ... Read full review

Review: Loving a Woman in Two Worlds

User Review  - Patrick - Goodreads

"Every breath taken in by the man who loves, and the woman who loves, goes to fill the water tank where the spirit horses drink." Yes, that happened. [Read for Poetry Month, April 2013] Read full review

Contents

Out of the Rolling Ocean the Crowd
8
Two People at Dawn
14
No Mountain Peak Without Its Rolling Foothills
20
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Robert Bly lives on a farm in his native state of Minnesota. He edited The Seventies magazine, which he founded as The Fifties and in the next decade called The Sixties. In 1966, with David Ray, he organized American Writers Against the Vietnam War. The Light Around the Body, which won the National Book Award in 1968, was strongly critical of the war in Vietnam and of American foreign policy. Since publication of Iron John: A Book About Men (1990), a response to the women's movement, Bly has been immensely popular, appearing on talk shows and advising men to retrieve their primitive masculinity through wildness. Bly is also a translator of Scandinavian literature, such as Twenty Poems of Tomas Transtromer. Through the Sixties Press and the Seventies Press, he introduced little-known European and South American poets to American readers. His magazines have been the center of a poetic movement involving the poets Donald Hall, Louis Simpson, and James Wright.

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