The Melange: A Variety of Original Pieces in Prose and Verse : Comprising the Elysium of Animals (Google eBook)

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Egerton Smith and Company, 1831 - English literature - 634 pages
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Page 82 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree...
Page 61 - To be no more : sad cure! for who would lose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through eternity., To perish rather, swallow'd up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated night, Devoid of sense and motion?
Page 417 - ... for all power given with trust for the attaining an end, being limited by that end, whenever that end is manifestly neglected or opposed, the trust must necessarily be forfeited, and the power devolve into the hands of those that gave it who may place it anew where they shall think best for their safety and security.
Page 216 - Witch. WHEN shall we three meet again, In thunder, lightning, or in rain ? 2 Witch.
Page 8 - Torn from his subjects, and his son's embrace, First let him see his friends in battle slain, And their untimely fate lament in vain : Arid when at length the cruel war shall cease, On hard conditions may he buy his peace ; Nor let him then enjoy supreme command But fall untimely by some hostile hand, And lie unburied in the common sand.
Page 123 - Do you hear, let them be well used, for they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time : after your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.
Page 275 - HARMLESS mirth is the best cordial against the consumption of the spirits : wherefore jesting is not unlawful if it trespasseth not in quantity, quality, or season.
Page 221 - That palter with us in a double sense ; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope. I'll not fight with thee. Macd. Then, yield thee, coward, And live to be the show and gaze o...
Page 447 - ... without any warrant or authority from any power either divine or human, but in direct contradiction to the laws both of God and man : and therefore the law has justly fixed the crime and punishment of murder, on them, and on their seconds also z.
Page 1 - The garden fears no blight, and needs no fence, For there is none to covet, all are full, The lion, and the libbard, and the bear, Graze with the fearless flocks ; all bask at noon Together, or all gambol in the shade Of the same grove, and drink one common stream.

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