Lady Bird: A Biography of Mrs. Johnson (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Taylor Trade Publications, Jan 1, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 350 pages
8 Reviews
After three years of cooperation with the author, Claudia "Lady Bird" Johnson ended her participation in this biography after an essay Russel published about LBJ's infidelities. Lady Bird covers the full spectrum of Mrs. Johnson's life, career, and ultimately her multi-layers, seldom-documented relationship with LBJ.
  

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Review: Lady Bird: A Biography of Mrs. Johnson

User Review  - Dionne - Goodreads

The main thing I remember about this book was how it portrayed LBJ. If even half of the things that were said about him were true, I am completely disgusted. Read full review

Review: Lady Bird: A Biography of Mrs. Johnson

User Review  - Brooke - Goodreads

After reading a little about the Johnsons from the Kennedy's point of view, I wanted to know more about Lady Bird. I found her strong and spirited, loving and kind. She was a woman ahead of her time ... Read full review

Contents

Lady Birds Red Shoes
11
Marriage the Ultimatum
15
Gone to Texas
26
Motherless Child
40
First Flight
57
The Moth Finds the Flame
73
A TenWeek Affair
91
A Life Behind Walls
113
Lady Birds Thin Line
214
Whistling in the Dark
240
Paradise Lost
271
Home to Texas
302
Our Lady of Flowers
311
Author Interview List
316
Selected Bibliography
318
Notes
320

Getting Rich
141
LBJs Midlife Crisis
168
The Trap of Her Fathers House
184
Acknowledgments
338
Index
339
Copyright

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Page 11 - Shoes:" I stand in the ring in the dead city and tie on the red shoes . . . They are not mine. They are my mother's. Her mother's before. Handed down like an heirloom but hidden like shameful letters.

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About the author (2004)

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