On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1995 - Psychology - 420 pages
61 Reviews
The late Carl Rogers, founder of the humanistic psychology movement, revolutionized psychotherapy with his concept of "client-centered therapy." His influence has spanned decades, but that influence has become so much a part of mainstream psychology that the ingenious nature of his work has almost been forgotten. A new introduction by Peter Kramer sheds light on the significance of Dr. Rogers's work today. New discoveries in the field of psychopharmacology, especially that of the antidepressant Prozac, have spawned a quick-fix drug revolution that has obscured the psychotherapeutic relationship. As the pendulum slowly swings back toward an appreciation of the therapeutic encounter, Dr. Rogers's "client-centered therapy" becomes particularly timely and important.
  

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Review: On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy

User Review  - Annette - Goodreads

He writes of significant things he learned in his experience and study: 1. In my relationships with persons I have found that it does not help, in the long run, to act as though I were something that ... Read full review

Review: On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy

User Review  - Tyler - Goodreads

I enjoyed the light-hearted look at psychotherapy. I felt like Rogers' writing style reflected his overall philosophy regarding psychotherapy and I think his ideas will likely stay with me for some time. Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Educated at the University of Wisconsin, Carl Rogers intended to become a Protestant minister, entering the Union Theological Seminary in 1924. When he realized that he was more interested in spirituality than religion, he left the seminary. While working on his Ph.D. at Columbia University, he began to question some of the accepted techniques of psychotherapy, especially in the area of therapist-patient relationships. According to Current Biography, "he is best known as the originator of the nondirective "client centered' theory of psychotherapy. This prescribes a person-to-person, rather than a doctor-patient relationship between therapist and client, and allows the client to control the course, pace, and length of his own treatment."Rogers incorporated many of the elements of this theory into the basic structure of encounter groups. The author of many books and articles, Rogers taught at several large universities for many years and conducted a private practice as a counseling psychologist. He received many professional awards in official recognition of his high achievements, most notably the presidency of the American Psychological Association (1946--47).

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