White Dog

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University of Chicago Press, Dec 1, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 279 pages
4 Reviews
Both a personal memoir and a French novelist's encounter with American reality, White Dog is an unforgettable portrait of racism and hypocrisy. Set in the tumultuous Los Angeles of 1968, Romain Gary's story begins when a German shepherd strays into his life: "He was watching me, his head cocked to one side, with that unbearable intensity of dogs in the pound waiting for a rescuer." A lost police canine, this "white dog" is programmed to respond violently to the sight of a black man and Gary's attempts to deprogram it—like his attempts to protect his wife, the actress Jean Seberg; like her endeavors to help black activists; like his need to rescue himself from the "predicament of being trapped, lock, stock and barrel within a human skin"—lead from crisis to grief.

Using the re-education of this adopted pet as a metaphor for the need to quash American racism, Gary develops a domestic crisis into a full-scale social allegory.
  

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Review: White Dog

User Review  - Aaron - Goodreads

Written as a fake memoir.Author Romain Gary and his wife find a stray white German Shepard which they take in.Only it turns out that the previous owner was a racist who has trained the dog to attack ... Read full review

Review: White Dog

User Review  - Hamed - Goodreads

Not the best I have read in this theme, but the story is interesting at some points. It is very typical of Roman I believe. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
11
Section 3
34
Section 4
37
Section 5
59
Section 6
88
Section 7
93
Section 8
98
Section 13
161
Section 14
168
Section 15
177
Section 16
187
Section 17
198
Section 18
213
Section 19
222
Section 20
235

Section 9
118
Section 10
128
Section 11
148
Section 12
158
Section 21
248
Section 22
258
Section 23
270
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

A best-selling author in France and a two-time winner of the Prix Goncourt, Romain Gary wrote in both French and English and under the pseudonyms Emile Ajar Gary and Fosco Sinibaldi. Best known for Lady L, The Life Before Us, Promise at Dawn: A Memoir, and The Roots of Heaven, he published his first novel, L'éducation européenne, when he was 31. His film, Les Oiseaux vont mourir au Pérou, was banned by the Cinema Control Commission. Gary committed suicide in Paris in 1980.

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