Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

Front Cover
Penguin, 2006 - History - 933 pages
212 Reviews
Tony Judt's 'Postwar' makes one lament the overuse of the word 'groundbreaking.' It is an unprecedented accomplishment; the first truly European history of contemporary Europe, from Lisbon to Leningrad, based on research in six languages, covering thirty-four countries across sixty years in a single integrated narrative, using a great deal of material from newly available sources. Tony Judt has drawn on forty years of reading and writing about modern Europe to create a fully rounded, deep account of the continent's recent past. The book integrates international relations, domestic politics, ideas, social change, economic development, and culture - high and low - into a single grand narrative. Every country has its chance to play the lead, and although the big themes are superbly handled - including the cold war, the love/hate relationship with America, cultural and economic malaise and rebirth, and the myth and reality of unification - none of them is allowed to overshadow the rich pageant that is the whole. Vividly and clearly written for the general reader; witty, opinionated, and full of fresh and surprising stories and asides; visually rich and rewarding, with useful and provocative maps, photos, and cartoons throughout, Postwar is a movable feast for lovers of history and lovers of Europe alike.
  

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Well written and thoroughly researched. - Goodreads
I can't imagine a better introduction to the subject. - Goodreads
A sublime samizdat selection. - Goodreads
A great overview although a little dull at times - Goodreads
Well organized with brilliant insight. - Goodreads
The pacing is amazing! - Goodreads

Review: Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

User Review  - Anton - Goodreads

The moral of the whole book is that an ability to forget is a politician's best asset in the struggle to stay relevant. Read full review

Review: Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 (Η Ευρώπη μετά τον Πόλεμο #1)

User Review  - Alasse - Goodreads

Oh boy. Wish me luck! Read full review

Contents

The Legacy of War
13
Retribution
41
The Rehabilitation of Europe
63
The Impossible Settlement
100
The Coming of the Cold War
129
Into the Whirlwind
165
Culture Wars
197
The End of Old Europe
226
Politics in a New Key
484
A Time of Transition
504
The New Realism
535
The Power of the Powerless
559
The End of the Old Order
585
After the Fall 19892005
635
A Fissile Continent
637
The Reckoning
665

Prosperity and Its Discontents 19531971
239
The Politics of Stability
241
Lost Illusions
278
The Age of Affluence
324
The Social Democratic Moment
360
The Spectre of Revolution
390
The End of the Affair
422
Recessional 19711989
451
Diminished Expectations
453
The Old Europeand the New
701
The Varieties of Europe
749
Europe as a Way of Life
777
EPILOGUE
801
An Essay on Modern European Memory
803
Suggestions for Further Reading
835
Index
879
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Tony Judt was the Erich Maria Remarque Professor of European Studies at New York University, as well as the founder and director of the Remarque Institute, dedicated to creating an ongoing conversation between Europe and the United States. He was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, and the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, and also taught at Cambridge, Oxford, and Berkeley. Professor Judt was a frequent contributor to The New York Review of BooksThe Times Literary Supplement, The New RepublicThe New York Times, and many journals across Europe and the United States. He is the author or editor of fifteen books, including Thinking the Twentieth CenturyThe Memory ChaletIll Fares the LandReappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, and Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, which was one of The New York Times Book Review’s Ten Best Books of 2005, the winner of the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Book Award, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He died in August 2010 at the age of sixty-two.


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