Flora Americae Septentrionalis: or, A systematic arrangement and description of the plants of North America. Containing, besides what have been described by preceding authors, many new and rare species, collected during twelve years travels and residence in that country (Google eBook)

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Printed for White, Cochrane, and Co., 1814 - Plants
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Page x - Andes, had unfortunately been lost, by being deposited among other things at the foot of those mountains. The loss of this first collection is the more to be regretted, when I consider that the small collection communicated to me, consisting of about one hundred and fifty specimens, contained not above a dozen plants well known to me to be natives of North America...
Page xxix - Traité des arbres et arbustes qui se cultivent en France en pleine terre...
Page 359 - This was not confined to the author's own collections, but aimed at completeness, or to give " a systematic arrangement and description of the plants of North America, containing, besides what have been described by preceding authors, many new and rare species, collected during twelve years' travels and residence in that country.
Page 261 - PURSH remarks that he has frequently observed a singularity in this plant, and it might be interesting to make further inquiry into its cause. It is that, in a dark night, when no objects can be distinguished at an inconsiderable distance, this plant, when in full flower, can be seen at a great distance, having a bright white appearance, which, probably, may arise from some phosphoric properties of the flower.
Page ix - In the spring of the latter year, as he says, he " set out for the mountains and western territories of the Southern States, beginning at Maryland and extending to the Carolinas (in which tract the interesting high mountains of Virginia and Carolina took my particular attention), returning late in the autumn through the lower countries along the sea-coast to Philadelphia.
Page 153 - This beautiful species has, to my knowledge, not yet been introduced into the gardens. I have only seen it in its native place, and in the garden of Mr. John Bartram, near Philadelphia.
Page x - America to the Pacific Ocean, by the way of the Missouri and the great Columbia rivers, executed under the direction of the Government of the United States. A small but highly interesting collection of dried plants was put into my hands by this gentleman, in order to describe and figure those I thought new, for the purpose of inserting them in the account of his Travels, which he was then engaged in preparing for the press.
Page xi - I consider that the small collection communicated to me, consisting of about one hundred and fifty specimens, contained not above a dozen plants well known to me to be natives of North America, the rest being either eatirely new or but little known, and among them at least six distinct and new genera.
Page x - A much more extensive one made on their slow ascent toward the Rocky Mountains and the chains of the northern Andes, had unfortunately been lost, by being deposited among other things at the foot of these mountains.
Page viii - University of Pennsylvania, &c. whose industrious researches in all the different branches of natural history are so well known to the literary world. He likewise, for some time previous, had been collecting materials for an American Flora.

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