World Peace: A Written Debate Between William Howard Taft and William Jennings Bryan (Google eBook)

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George H. Doran Company, 1917 - Peace - 138 pages
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Page 99 - Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it must be unwise in us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or enmities.
Page 99 - Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice?
Page 98 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Page xii - The signatory powers shall jointly use forthwith both their economic and military forces against any one of their number that goes to war, or commits acts of hostility, against another of the signatories before any question arising shall be submitted as provided in the foregoing.
Page xii - First : All justiciable questions arising between the signatory powers, not settled by negotiation, shall, subject to the limitations of treaties, be submitted to a Judicial Tribunal for hearing and judgment, both upon the merits and upon any issue as to its jurisdiction of the question.
Page 28 - We believe it to be desirable for the United States to join a league of nations binding the signatories to the following: First: All justiciable questions arising between the signatory powers, not settled by negotiation, shall, subject to the limitations of treaties, be submitted to a judicial tribunal for hearing and judgment, both upon the merits and upon any issue as to its jurisdiction of the question.
Page 81 - The peace and security for peace will be that the nations will band themselves together to punish the first peacebreaker who comes out. As to the armies of Europe, every weapon will be a sword of justice in the government of men; every arm will be a constabulary of peace.
Page 103 - ... history such as no other nation has ever enjoyed. Nothing has been able to check the onward march of this idea. I am not willing that this nation shall cast aside the omnipotent weapon of truth to seize again the weapons of physical warfare. I would not exchange the glory of this Republic for the glory of all the empires that have risen and fallen since time began.
Page 30 - More to the point, in his view "for this nation to exchange its moral prestige for the expensive privilege of putting its army and navy at the command of European monarchs, to be used in settling European quarrels, would be retrogression, not progress a stepping down, not ascent to a higher...
Page 97 - ... therefore, the United States in its own interest and in the interest of preserving threatened stocks of fish must take emergency action to manage, regulate, and control the taking of fish within 200 nautical miles of its shore, and the taking of anadromous species...

References from web pages

William Howard Taft bibliography
World Peace; a Written Debate Between William Howard Taft and William Jennings Bryan. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1970. ...
www.ca6.uscourts.gov/ lib_hist/ courts/ supreme/ judges/ wht-bib.html

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