The Pathbreakers from River to Ocean: The Story of the Great West from the Time of Coronado to the Present (Google eBook)

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Lakeside Press, 1911 - America - 263 pages
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Page 202 - It is cold and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my chiefs. I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever.
Page 104 - I came with an eye partly open for my people who sit in darkness. I go back with both eyes closed. How can I go back blind to my blind people? I made my way to you with strong arms through many enemies and strange lands that I might carry back much to them. I go back with both arms broken and empty!
Page 202 - The little children are freezing to death. My people some of them have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and to see how many of them I can find; maybe I shall find them among the dead.
Page 179 - ... hoofs comes faintly to the ear - another instant a whoop and a hurrah from our upper deck, a wave of the rider's hand, but no reply, and man and horse burst past our excited faces, and go winging away like a belated fragment of a storm!
Page 105 - You took me to where you allow your women to dance, as we do not ours; and the Book was not there. You took me to where they worship the Great Spirit with candles; and the Book was not there.
Page 105 - When I tell my poor, blind people, after one more snow, in the big council, that I did not bring the Book, no word will be spoken by our old men or by our young braves.
Page 254 - The old days are gone. The house dog sits on the hill where yesterday the coyote sang. The fences are short and small, and within them grow green things instead of gray. There are many smokes rising over the prairie, but they are wide and black instead of thin and blue.
Page 16 - Irresolution and deliberation are no longer in season. I renounce Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans that I will cede, it is the whole colony, without any reservation.
Page 104 - I came to you over the trail of many moons from the setting sun. You were the friends of my fathers, who have all gone the long way. I came with an eye partly open for my people who sit in darkness. I go back with both eyes closed. How can I go back blind to my blind people? I made my way to you with strong arms through many enemies and strange lands that I might carry back much to them.
Page 179 - Every neck is stretched further, and every eye strained wider. Away across the endless dead level of the prairie a black speck appears against the sky, and it is plain that it moves.

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Grace Raymond Hebard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hebard, Grace R. The Pathbreakers from River to Ocean: The Story of the Great West from the Time of Coronado to the Present. ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ Grace_Raymond_Hebard

ebay 香港: PATHBREAKERS FROM RIVER TO OCEAN, GRACE HEBARD 1913 HB ...
THE PATHBREAKERS FROM RIVER TO OCEAN. THE STORY OF THE GREAT WEST FROM THE TIME OF CORONADO TO THE PRESENT. by Grace Raymond Hebard. Chicago. ...
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