An essay on the instruction and amusements of the blind (Google eBook)

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Sampson Low, Marston, 1894 - Blind - 154 pages
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Page 125 - ... who then took hold of his arms in the same manner, and moving them about as he would have done his own before a person who could see, he filled up the deficiencies of the first operation, and thus completed the series of ideas which he wished to communicate to his companion.
Page 124 - ... dumb the idea of the blind. * When the deaf and dumb, in his turn, wished to make himself understood, he did it in two ways : he stood with his arms stretched out and motionless, before the blind person, who took hold of him a little above the wrists, and without squeezing them, followed all the motions they made ; or if it happened that the signs were not understood, the blind man put himself in the place . of the deaf and dumb, who then took hold of his arms in the same manner, and moving them...
Page 131 - It is better, on this account, in graduating the bottle, to make two scratches as represented in the drawing, one at the top and the other at the bottom of the curve : this prevents any future mistake.
Page 39 - Tantalus, whom the fable represents to us as devoured by unextinguishable thirst in the midst of water, they are continually subjected to cruel privations. An insurmountable barrier separates them from the rest of men; they are alone in the midst of us, unless we know that artificial language which the talent and charity of their ingenious teacher have created for them.
Page 56 - would not be very glad to have his sight ? ' he replied, ' If it were not for curiosity, I would rather have long arms; it seems to me that my hands would teach me better what is passing in the moon than your eyes or telescopes ; and, besides, the eyes cease to see sooner than the hands to touch. It would therefore be as well to improve the organ I have, as to give me the one I want.
Page 40 - ... have created for them. The custom which they have of reading the physiognomy is very often a subject of ever additional anxiety to them; they do not always divine aright; doubt and uncertainty increase their anxiety and suspicions; a serious cast, which resembles sadness, then invades their countenance, and proves that with us they are in their state of real privation. Obliged to -concentrate themselves within themselves, the activity of their imagination is thus greatly augmented; and as attention...
Page 123 - This new language soon became common to the two families; the deaf and dumb who found it tiresome to have written on their back what they could see perfectly well, attempted to make the blind write in the air, as they do themselves : this means, which was as long as the former, appeared to them more uncertain, as the blind wrote ill in that way ; they therefore preferred the characters the latter made use of; but as these characters...
Page 123 - ... easily transported, the dumb taught the blind their manual alphabet, and the one by sight and the other by touch, easily found by the inspection of their fingers, the letters that are formed by their different combinations. Nevertheless this manual alphabet only exhibiting words, slackened conversation amazingly. They felt the want of a more rapid communication, and the blind...
Page 35 - ... correspondence ; we know perfectly well that he exists, but we cannot conceive how. ' If not very open-hearted, on the other hand, nature gives them an ample compensation by endowing them with a prodigious activity of imagination and an insatiable desire of knowledge, which, in them, is a substitute for many affections that they want, or at least for the expansion which such sentiments might have. This state of their imagination banishes ennui, which is one of the least inconveniences of blindness...
Page 124 - They felt the want of a more rapid communication, and the blind learnt the theory of the signs of the deaf and dumb : each sign thus representing a thought, the communication was complete. This study was long and tedious, because it supposes a pretty complete knowledge of grammar ; but the wish to talk got the better of all these difficulties, and in a few months, the signs being perfectly well known, took place of all the other means till then employed. The exchange between them was performed in...

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