Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1900 - Naturalists
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Page 197 - I asserted — and I repeat — that a man has no reason to be ashamed of having an ape for his grandfather. If there were an ancestor whom I should feel shame in recalling it would rather be a man — a man of restless and versatile intellect — who, not content with an equivocal...
Page 339 - When I reached intellectual maturity, and began to ask myself whether I was an atheist, a theist, or a pantheist ; a materialist or an idealist; a Christian or a freethinker; I found that the more I learned and reflected, the less ready was the answer; until, at last, I came to the conclusion that I had neither art nor part with any of these denominations, except the last. The one thing in which most of these good people were agreed was the one thing in which I differed from them. They were quite...
Page 231 - Science seems to me to teach in the highest and strongest manner the great truth which is embodied in the Christian conception of entire surrender to the will of God. Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.
Page 32 - ... people but ourselves. In exchange, we had the interest of being about the last voyagers, I suppose, to whom it could be possible to meet with people who knew nothing of fire-arms — as we did on the South Coast of New Guinea — and of making acquaintance with a variety of interesting savage and semi-civilised people.
Page 120 - I cannot but think that he who finds a certain proportion of pain and evil inseparably woven up in the life of the very worms, will bear his own share with more courage and submission ; and will, at any rate, view with suspicion those weakly amiable -theories of the Divine government, which would have us believe pain to be an oversight and a mistake, — to be corrected by and by.
Page 435 - And the very air he breathes should be charged with that enthusiasm for truth, that fanaticism of veracity, which is a greater possession than much learning; a nobler gift than the power of increasing knowledge...
Page 190 - In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be based on a new foundation, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
Page 232 - The absolute justice of the system of things is as clear to me as any scientific fact. The gravitation of sin to sorrow...
Page 361 - That in the schools provided by the board the Bible shall be read, and there shall be given such explanations and such instruction therefrom in the principles of morality and religion, as are suited to the capacities of children : provided always— 1.
Page 315 - That peculiarity has been passed on to me in full strength; it has often stood me in good stead; it has sometimes played me sad tricks, and it has always been a danger. But, after all, if my time were to come over again, there is nothing I would less willingly part with than my inheritance of mother wit.

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