History of Russia: From the Foundation of the Monarchy by Rurik, to the Accession of Catharine the Second, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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T. N. Longman and O. Rees, 1800 - Russia
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Page 273 - But how great was our furprife, when, befides a defect " in his utterance, that was uneafy to himfelf, and rendered " his difcourfe almoft unintelligible to others, we obferved " in him a total privation of fenfe and reafon ! Thofe who " accompanied us, during this interview...
Page 317 - Remove from Berlin with the royal family. Let the archives be carried to Potsdam. The town may make conditions with the enemy.
Page 311 - They bad, besides, taken a post, which they had so strongly entrenched, and defended with such a prodigious number of cannon, that it was extremely difficult and hazardous to attempt them ; yet, under these accumulated disadvantages, it was absolutely necessary that he should fight. The detachments from count Daun's army already menaced Berlin ; Saxony, which he was obliged to leave exposed, had become a prey to the Imperialists ; and the Russians, united with the Austrians, encamped before his eyes...
Page 311 - Auguft, at two in the morning ; and, having formed themfelves in a wood, advanced towards the enemy. It was near eleven before the action began. The principal effort of the king of Pruffia was againft the left wing of the ruffian army.
Page 317 - The town may make conditions with the enemy." It were vain to attempt to draw the picture of the court and city on the receipt of such news, in the midst of the joy which they indulged for the accounts they had received but a few hours before. The terror was increased by the indistinct relation that soon followed, which gave them only to understand, that their army was totally routed ; that there was no account of the king, and...
Page 309 - Frederick now marched with ten thousand of his best troops to join the broken army of Wedel, in order to drive this formidable and determined enemy from his country. Prince Henry commanded the remainder of his army, which was too well posted to fear any insult during his absence. The eyes of all were fixed upon his march, and his soldiers who remembered Zorndorf, eagerly longed to try their strength once more with the same antagonists.
Page 353 - without conftraint, and in the mod folemn manner, to " the ruffian empire, and to the whole univerfe, that I for " ever renounce the government of the faid empire, never ". defiring hereafter to reign therein, either as an abfolute ' fovereign, or under any other form of government ; " never wifhing to afpire thereto, to ufe any means, of any
Page 274 - ... convinced that the only meafure we could take to fuccour the unfortunate prince, was to leave him where we found him, and to procure him all the comforts and conveniences that his fituation would admit of.
Page 316 - Seidlitz was particularly unfortunate; for to that wound the failure of the horse, which he commanded, was principally attributed. It was to the spirit and conduct of this able officer that a great part of the success at Zorndorf had been owing in the last campaign. It is known, that if it had not been for a seasonable movement of the horse, the whole Prussian army had then been in great danger of a defeat. The night, and the prudent use of some eminences, which were defended as well as circumstances...
Page 158 - On all the solemn festivals, he only wore the uniform of his preobajenskoi regiment of guards. I saw him in 1721 give a public audience to the ambassadors of Persia. He entered the hall of audience in nothing more than a surtout of coarse brown cloth. When he was seated on the throne, the attendants brought him a coat of blue gros-de-Naples, embroidered with silver, which he put on with great precipitation, because the ambassadors were waiting for admittance. During this time he turned his eyes towards...

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