Database processing: fundamentals, design & implementation

Front Cover
Prentice Hall, 2002 - Business & Economics - 671 pages
2 Reviews
"Database Processing, 8/E provides a solid, modern foundation in the fundamentals of database processing. A three-chapter discussion of the management of multi-user databases includes basic concepts, Oracle, and SQL Server 2000. The latest Internet standards for database processing discuss multi-tier architecture and XML Schema to enable readers to understand the characteristics of database publishing using Internet technology while at the same time learning the most up-to-date standards. Other coverage includes ODBC, OLE DB, ADO, ASP, and other Microsoft technology for database publishing, as well as Java, JDBC, and JSP for publishing databases using Java technology. For individuals who want an overall perspective of the nature and use of databases, and a look at the features of the latest version of Microsoft Access.

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Review: Database Processing: Fundamentals, Design, and Implementation

User Review  - Savitri - Goodreads

This was the required textbook for an intro to DB class. I've worked with DBs, learned what I learned on my own, and this was my first real DB class. The book's pretty good. I thought it was very ... Read full review

Review: Database Processing: Fundamentals, Design, and Implementation (10th Edition)

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

Good for beginners. Read full review

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Contents

Introduction to Database Development
25
Components of Applications
34
Database Development Processes
41
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

David Kroenke has been a sailor since 1971 and currently owns a Mason 44. He has cruised the West Coast extensively, roamed the Inside Passage and the coast of British Columbia, and sailed to Mexico and back. His next Big Trip is a voyage to the Marquesas. Although he holds a Ph.D. in engineering, he claims his chief qualification for writing "Know Your Boat" is the self-education process he undertook after spending piles of money in boatyards.

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