The Quarterly Review, Volume 57 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Murray, 1836
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Page 356 - Still rusted in their bony hands; In plague and famine some ! Earth's cities had no sound nor tread : And ships were drifting with the dead To shores where all was dumb...
Page 486 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Page 294 - Scotchman's, who refused to be cured of the itch because it made him unco' thoughtful of his wife and bonny Inverary. " But, now, to be serious : let me ask myself what gives me a wish to see Ireland again. The country is a fine one, perhaps ? no. There are good company in Ireland ? no. The conversation there is generally made up of a smutty toast or a bawdy song ; the vivacity supported by some humble cousin, who had just folly enough to earn his dinner.
Page 354 - Eternal HOPE ! when yonder spheres sublime Peal'd their first notes to sound the march of Time, Thy joyous youth began but not to fade. When all the sister planets have...
Page 300 - The reasons you have given me for breeding up your son a scholar, are judicious and convincing : I should, however, be glad to know for what particular profession he is designed. If he be assiduous, and divested of strong passions (for passions in youth always lead to pleasure), he may do very well in your college ; for it must be owned, that the industrious poor have good encouragement there, perhaps better than in any other in Europe. But if he has ambition, strong passions, and an exquisite sensibility...
Page 299 - I should actually be as unfit for the society of my friends at home, as I detest that which I am obliged to partake of here. I can now neither partake of the pleasure of a revel, nor contribute to raise its jollity. I can neither laugh nor drink; have contracted a hesitating disagreeable manner of speaking, and a visage that looks illnature itself; in short, I have thought myself into a settled melancholy, and an utter disgust of all that life brings with it.
Page 295 - The booksellers in Ireland republish every performance there without making the author any consideration. I would, in this respect, disappoint their avarice, and have all the profits of my labour to myself.
Page 399 - The untimely labour of the night, and the protracted labour of the day, with respect to children, not only tends to diminish future expectations as to the general sum of life and industry, by impairing the strength and destroying the vital stamina of the rising generation, but it too often gives encouragement to idleness, extravagance and profligacy in the parents, who, contrary to the order of nature, subsist by the oppression of their offspring.
Page 300 - If he be assiduous, and divested of strong passions, (for passions in youth always lead to pleasure), he may do very well in your college ; for it must be owned, that the industrious poor have good encouragement there, perhaps better than in any other in Europe. But if he has ambition, strong passions, and an exquisite sensibility of contempt, do not send him there, unless you have no other trade. for him except your own.
Page 298 - I have been some years struggling with a wretched being, with all that contempt which indigence brings with it, with all those strong passions which make contempt insupportable. What then has a gaol that is formidable ? I shall at least have the society of wretches, and such is to me true society.

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