The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 1, 1994 - Philosophy - 268 pages
3 Reviews
This new interdisciplinary textbook by Martin Hollis offers an exceptionally clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of social science. It unearths central philosophical problems underlying the standard ways of thinking about social institutions and social actions, leading the reader to reflect upon the nature of scientific method itself. Is the aim to explain the social world after the manner of the natural world, or to understand it from within? Writing in his characteristically clear and incisive prose, Martin Hollis reveals the crucial role to be played by philosophy in the study of the social sciences.
  

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Review: The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction

User Review  - Jonny Berglind - Goodreads

An introduction Read full review

Review: The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction

User Review  - scott - Goodreads

Another books one of my dissertation advisors is imposing on me. It's something. But nothing I see a need for most people to pick up. So much time spent qunatifying any and every thing, while no meaning can be derived from the statisical conclusions - what a waste of scholastic energy! Read full review

Contents

Introduction problems of Structure and Action
1
Discovering truth the rationalist way
23
Positive science the empiricist way
40
Ants Spiders and Bees a third way?
66
Systems and functions
94
Games with Rational Agents
115
Understanding social action
142
Self and roles
163
Explaining and understanding
183
A valueneutral social science?
202
Rationality and relativism
224
Conclusion two stones to tell
248
Bibliography
261
Index
268
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