The Moral Animal: Evolutionary Psychology and Everyday Life

Front Cover
Abacus, 1996 - Behavior evolution - 466 pages
190 Reviews
In this work, Robert Wright examines a science that has emerged from the work of evolutionary biologists and social scientists. Taking the life and work of the evolutionist Charles Darwin as his context, Wright seeks to demonstrate how Darwin's ideas have stood the test of time and retells - from the perspective of evolutionary psychology - the stories of Darwin's marriage, family, life and career. From this paradigm, Wright draws conclusions about the structure of our most basic preoccupations - sex, ambition, politics, justice - aiming to throw light on the background of these fundamental instincts, and to show why they are so important to us. The work poses questions about not only the biological bases for morality, but also the biological bases for amorality.

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Mostly loved the insight into Darwin's life - Goodreads
I actually don't like the writing style. - Goodreads
A great introduction to the field. - Goodreads
tons of wonderful insights into humanity. - Goodreads
a good read/intro into evolutionary psychology. - Goodreads
This book is a great introduction. - Goodreads

Review: The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology

User Review  - Andrew Feist - Goodreads

tons of wonderful insights into humanity. perhaps not as profoundly novel as other collections of knowledge like How the Mind Works or Thinking Fast and Slow, but it has a lot more flare and style. He ... Read full review

Review: The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

Wright presents an excellent overview of evolutionary psychology and delves a little into some of the moral issues it raises. Read full review

About the author (1996)

Robert Wright has written extensively for ATLANTIC MONTHLY, NEW YORKER and TIME magazine and currently works as a senior editor at THE NEW REPUBLIC. His latest book, NON-ZERO, is also published by Abacus. He lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and family.

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