Bristol: Montaup to Poppasquash

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Arcadia Publishing, Aug 1, 2001 - History - 160 pages
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The picturesque images and steadfast spirit of small-town America thrive within Bristol. One need only to look along its tree-lined streets and centuries-old waterfront and into its historic homes and buildings to see the romance of Rhode Island's past mingling with its present. Heritage and tradition, especially its long-running celebrations of the Fourth of July, are essential in understanding the character and identity of this little town on the bay.

Bristol: Montaup to Poppasquash takes readers on a unique journey through the community's past, beginning with the voyages of early Norse explorers and detailing major events that shaped the town's history, including the King Philip's War, the Revolutionary War, and a variety of other military conflicts that took local men and women away from their homes. Not only evoking memories of yesteryear, this compelling illustrated history explores the evolving personality of Bristol over the passing decades, from its days as a small fishing village and a haven for privateers to its present status as a premier boat-building center.

  

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Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Privateers Pirates and Slavers
23
The Town Emerges
44
The Herreshoff Legacy
59
Public and Private
74
The Day That We Celebrate
87
Recent Bristol History
114
Epilogue
135
A Linden Place Timeline
149
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Through expanding media coverage of the America's Cup races, public interest in the sport of yachting has exploded, and spectators are continually enthralled by the spectacle of crews in action with their finely engineered crafts pealing through ocean waters. Richard V. Simpson's stunning array of photographs and compelling statistics guide his readers on a fascinating visual journey of Rhode Island's intimate connection to the America's Cup.

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