Things Seen in Northern India (Google eBook)

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Dutton, 1912 - India - 236 pages
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Page 148 - Just after starting on my errand, while riding through the Kashmir gate, I observed by the side of the road a doolie, without bearers, and with evidently a wounded man inside. I dismounted to see if I could be of any use to the occupant, when I found, to my grief and consternation, that it was John Nicholson, with death written on his face. He told me that the bearers had put the doolie down and gone off to plunder ; that he was in great pain, and wished to be taken to the hospital. He was lying...
Page 185 - And those that follow'd, loosen, stone from stone, All my fair work; and from the ruin arose The shriek and curse of trampled millions, even As in the time before; but while I groan'd, From out the sunset pour'd an alien race, Who fitted stone to stone again, and Truth, Peace, Love and Justice came and dwelt therein...
Page 143 - Firdaus rue zamin ast — hamin ast to, hamin ast to, hamin ast (If there is a paradise on earth it is this, it is this, it is this).
Page 148 - I found, to my grief and consternation, that it was John Nicholson, with death written on his face. He told me that the bearers had put the doolie down and gone off to plunder ; that he was in great pain, and wished to be taken to the hospital. He was lying on his back, no wound was visible, and but for the pallor of his face, always colourless, there was no sign of the agony he must have been enduring. On my expressing a hope that he was not seriously wounded, he said, " I am dying : there is no...
Page 148 - Dismounting to see what help he might render, he found to his ' grief and consternation that it was John Nicholson, with death written on his face. He told me that the bearers had put the doolie down and gone off to plunder ; that he was in great pain, and wished to be taken to the hospital. He was lying on his back, no wound was visible, and but for the pallor on his face, always colourless, there was no sign of the agony he must have been enduring.
Page 148 - I searched about for the doolie-bearers, who, with other camp-followers, were busy ransacking the houses and shops in the neighbourhood, and carrying off everything of the slightest value they could lay their hands on. Having with difficulty collected four men, I put them in charge of a sergeant of the 61st Foot. Taking down his name, I told him who the wounded officer was, and ordered him to go direct to the field hospital. That was the last I saw of Nicholson.
Page 181 - His Majesty, King of Kings, Lord of Lords, Shadow of Allah, whose Court is now in Heaven ; Saith Jesus, on whom be peace, This World is a Bridge ; Pass thou over it, Build not upon it ! It lasteth but an Hour ; Devote its Minutes to thy Prayers ; for the Rest is Unseen and Unknown !" No other person has such a tomb as this ; nor pope, nor potentate, nor emperor.
Page 185 - God of heaven and earth. lie sees •An alien race Who fitted stone to stone again, and Truth, Peace, Love, and Justice came and dwelt therein. Nor in the field without were seen or heard Fires of Suttee, nor wail of baby wife, Or Indian widow, and in sleep I said. All praise to Alia by whatever hands My mission be accomplished...
Page 199 - The dome-covered cupola of the tower is seen from a great distance, and contains a fine-toned bell, which is heard all over the city and neighbourhood, the gift, many years ago, of the Rev. George Lea, and other friends in Birmingham, to the Peshawur Mission, through Colonel Martin. The cupola is surmounted by a large gilt cross, showing the Christian character of the...
Page 192 - Sikhs are never allowed to use scissors or razor to their hair, so they can be readily recognized by their long hair tied up in a knot on the top of their head, and the voluminous and tastefully folded turban which covers it, and which they almost constantly wear.

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