A Vindication of the Rights of Women (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2008 - Social Science - 208 pages
96 Reviews
  

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5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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Wollstonecraft's prose is an absolute pleasure to read. - Goodreads
She is a great writer and a very educated woman. - Goodreads
Well good, though a bit random in its layout. - Goodreads
A must read for women writing. - Goodreads

Review: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

User Review  - Liz Polding - Goodreads

I first read this at 16 and was utterly overwhelmed by it. Women as essentially domestic and an expectation that I should expect to get married, give up working and stay at home was something I had ... Read full review

Review: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

User Review  - Caz Barnes - Goodreads

This is heavy going as the author was so impassioned with the subject that she splurged unapologetically onto each page, often going off at tangents. Couple that with English grammar of the 1790's and ... Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
15
III
21
IV
29
V
47
VI
61
VII
87
VIII
123
IX
129
X
139
XI
149
XII
159
XIII
163
XIV
169
XV
191
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About the author (2008)

Mary Wollstonecraft was born in London on April 27, 1759. She opened a school in Newington Green with her sister Eliza and a friend Fanny Blood in 1784. Her experiences lead her to attack traditional teaching methods and suggested new topics of study in Thoughts on the Education of Girls. In 1792, she published A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, in which she attacked the educational restrictions that kept women ignorant and dependant on men as well as describing marriage as legal prostitution. In Maria or the Wrongs of Woman, published unfinished in 1798, she asserted that women had strong sexual desires and that it was degrading and immoral to pretend otherwise. In 1793, Wollstonecraft became involved with American writer Gilbert Imlay and had a daughter named Fanny. After this relationship ended, she married William Godwin in March 1797 and had a daughter named Mary in August. Wollstonecraft died from complications following childbirth on September 10, 1797. Her daughter Mary later married Percy Bysshe Shelley and wrote Frankenstein.

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