The Major Symptoms of Hysteria: Fifteen Lectures Given in the Medical School of Harvard University (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1907 - Hysteria - 345 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
22
III
44
IV
66
V
93
VI
117
VII
138
VIII
159
IX
182
X
208
XI
227
XII
245
XIII
270
XIV
293
XV
317
Copyright

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Page 26 - Remove from her the means of all annoyance, And still keep eyes upon her. So, good night; My mind she has mated, and amaz'd my sight. I think, but dare not speak. ' Gentlewoman. Good night, good doctor. [Exeunt.
Page 338 - Hysteria is a form of mental depression characterized by the retraction of the field of personal consciousness and a tendency to the dissociation and emancipation of the systems of ideas and
Page 323 - of mental depression, characterized by the contraction of the field of personal consciousness and a tendency to the dissociation and emancipation of the system of ideas and functions that constitute personality
Page 15 - The matrix is an animal which longs to generate children. When it remains barren for a long time after puberty, it finds it difficult to bear, it feels wroth, it goes about the whole body, closing the issues for
Page 28 - A man of thirty-two, Sm., presents a still more singular case. He usually remains in bed, for both his legs are paralyzed. We won't occupy ourselves with that paralysis to-day, although it is a very odd one. In the middle of the night he rises slowly, jumps lightly out of
Page 311 - It is a world of ideas, the most considerable, perhaps, that we can ever know, for we are far from having made the tour of the domain of personality. There are then in the "I feel," two things in presence of each other: a small, new, psychological fact, a little flame lighting
Page 317 - a special moral weakness, consisting in the lack of power, on the part of the feeble subject, to gather, to condense his psychological phenomena, and assimilate them to his personality.
Page 290 - I accept all you please. I am quite ready to obey you, and I will do it if you choose; only I tell you beforehand that the thing did not take." With the preceding definition of suggestion, these answers of the patient would have no meaning. The idea, having penetrated into the mind and having been accepted, should
Page 356 - pp., index, illus., $1.60 The author believes that a knowledge of the inflammatory process is the foundation of all pathology, and has here brought together all the data known to him bearing upon the subject, including some very recent, such as a description of Sir AE Wright's brilliant researches upon opsonins, and Professor Bier's treatment of inflammation by induced hypersemia.
Page 356 - Inflammation An Introduction to the Study of Pathology By J. GEORGE ADAMI. MD A revised and enlarged reprint of an article in Allbutt's "System of Medicine," by Dr. Adami, who is a Professor of Pathology in McGill University, Montreal. Cloth, gilt top, 8vo,

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