The A to Z of the Druzes

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2009 - History - 209 pages
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The Druzes are one of the smallest, least studied, and most esoteric religious communities in the Middle East. This is because the Druze teachings remain inaccessible not only to outsiders but also to uninitiated members within the Druze community itself. Furthermore, proselytizing-inducing someone to convert to one's own religious faith-has been prohibited since the establishment of the sect in the 11th century. In order to resist assimilation by the various empires and colonial powers that sought to dominate them-the Byzantines, various Arab dynasties, the Mamluks and Ottomans, the British and French, in addition to the nations that govern them-the Druzes disguise and conceal their beliefs. Therefore, not much is known by outsiders about the Druzes. This dictionary provides nearly 1,000 concise and informative cross-referenced A to Z entries on religious, political, and cultural themes, as well as entries on a number of major families and individuals (artists, writers, diplomats, and leaders) who have contributed to the Druze communities. This volume is also complemented with a chronology, an introductory essay, and a bibliography.
  

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Contents

Foreword
ix
Preface
xi
Acknowledgments
xiii
Note on Translation and Transliteration
xv
Acronyms and Abbreviations
xvii
Maps
xix
Chronology
xxiii
Introduction
xxxi
The Dictionary
1
Appendixes
179
Bibliography
183
About the Author
209
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

\Samy Swayd teaches courses on religious diversity and Islamic Studies at San Diego State University (SDSU). He is the founder and acting director of the Institute of Druze Studies (IDS), the co-editor of the Journal of Druze Studies (JDS), and the author of The Druzes: An Annotated Bibliography (1998) and Druze Scriptural Identity.

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