Aramis, or, The love of technology

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Harvard University Press, 1996 - History - 314 pages
5 Reviews

Bruno Latour has written a unique and wonderful tale of a technological dream gone wrong. As the young engineer and professor follow Aramis' trail--conducting interviews, analyzing documents, assessing the evidence--perspectives keep shifting: the truth is revealed as multilayered, unascertainable, comprising an array of possibilities worthy of Rashomon. The reader is eventually led to see the project from the point of view of Aramis, and along the way gains insight into the relationship between human beings and their technological creations. This charming and profound book, part novel and part sociological study, is Latour at his thought-provoking best.

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Review: Aramis, or the Love of Technology

User Review  - Cărăşălu - Goodreads

This a weird book in which Latour mixes sociological commentary proper with a lot of excerpts from official documents and interviews, all contained in a novel-like narrative framework: the story of a ... Read full review

Review: Aramis, or the Love of Technology

User Review  - Jesper Balslev - Goodreads

"You believed in the autonomy of technology." Read full review

Contents

An Exciting Innovation
12
Is Aramis Feasible?
51
ShillyShallying in the Seventies
84
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Bruno LaTour was born in the French province of Burgundy, where his family has been making wine for many generations. He was educated in Dijon, where he studied philosophy and Biblical exegesis. He then went to Africa, to complete his military service, working for a French organization similar to the American Peace Corps. While in Africa he became interested in the social sciences, particularly anthropology. LaTour believes that through his interests in philosophy, theology, and anthropology, he is actually pursuing a single goal, to understand the different ways that truth is built. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, LaTour has written about the philosophy and sociology of science in an original, insightful, and sometimes quirky way. Works that have been translated to English include The Pasteurization of France; Laboratory Life; Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers through Society; We Have Never Been Modern; and Aramis, or the Love of Technology. LaTour is a professor at the Center for the Sociology of Innovation, a division of the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, in Paris.