Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace (Google eBook)

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Random House Publishing Group, Dec 30, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 384 pages
8 Reviews
In the 1930s, as waves of war and persecution were crashing over Europe, two young Jewish women began separate journeys of survival. One, a Polish-born woman from Bialystok, where virtually the entire Jewish community would soon be sent to the ghetto and from there to Hitler’s concentration camps, was determined not only to live but to live with pride and defiance. The other, a Russian-born intellectual and introvert, would eventually become a high-level censor under Stalin’s regime. At war’s end, both women found themselves in Moscow, where informers lurked on every corner and anti-Semitism reigned. It was there that Ester and Ruzya would first cross paths, there that they became the closest of friends and learned to trust each other with their lives.

In this deeply moving family memoir, journalist Masha Gessen tells the story of her two beloved grandmothers: Ester, the quicksilver rebel who continually battled the forces of tyranny; Ruzya, a single mother who joined the Communist Party under duress and made the compromises the regime exacted of all its citizens. Both lost their first loves in the war. Both suffered unhappy unions. Both were gifted linguists who made their living as translators. And both had children—Ester a boy, and Ruzya a girl—who would grow up, fall in love, and have two children of their own: Masha and her younger brother.

With grace, candor, and meticulous research, Gessen peels back the layers of secrecy surrounding her grandmothers’ lives. As she follows them through this remarkable period in history—from the Stalin purges to the Holocaust, from the rise of Zionism to the fall of communism—she describes how each of her grandmothers, and before them her great-grandfather, tried to navigate a dangerous line between conscience and compromise.

Ester and Ruzya is a spellbinding work of storytelling, filled with political intrigue and passionate emotion, acts of courage and acts of betrayal. At once an intimate family chronicle and a fascinating historical tale, it interweaves the stories of two women with a brilliant vision of Russian history. The result is a memoir that reads like a novel—and an extraordinary testament to the bonds of family and the power of hope, love, and endurance.


From the Hardcover edition.
  

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Review: Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace

User Review  - Angela - Goodreads

I learned a lot about living through a war and political oppression from this book, and its subjects had interesting lives. Doesn't have the expert pacing of a novel, because it isn't one. I dropped ... Read full review

Review: Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace

User Review  - Shannon Wyss - Goodreads

An excellent biography of two Jewish women living in the USSR during and after World War II, one from Poland, the other from the Soviet Union itself. Reading the stories of individuals who survived ... Read full review

Contents

PRoLocuE
11
PART
80
PART THREE
121
PART FouR
151
PART FIVE
194
PART
280
PART SEvEi1
330
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Masha Gessen was born in the U.S.S.R., emigrated to the United States when she was fourteen years old, and later returned to Russia as a foreign correspondent. She makes her permanent home in Moscow with her partner, Svenya, and their two children but is currently living in Boston, where she has a Neiman Fellowship at Harvard.


From the Hardcover edition.

Bibliographic information