Aristoxenou Harmonika Stoicheia (Google eBook)

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At the Clarendon Press, 1902 - Music - 303 pages
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Page 188 - We shall now proceed to the consideration of Harmonic and its parts. It is to be observed that in general the subject of our study is the question, In melody of every kind what are the natural laws according to which the voice in ascending or descending places the intervals? For we hold that the voice follows a natural law in its motion, and does not place the intervals at random.
Page 233 - ... precedent at the time of the accession of King Kalakaua. Moreover, the troops had orders to take no part in the contest, but merely to protect property. Into the questions of veracity raised by Mr. Blount's report and Mr. Stevens' denials, as well as into the question of motive in landing marines, for the purposes of the present argument it is not necessary to go. The hasty recognition of the provisional government by the United States was wrong; if it was the sequel of a conspiracy hatched by...
Page 189 - ... or some other such handicraftsman. But for the student of musical science accuracy of sense-perception is a fundamental requirement. For if his sense-perception is deficient, it is impossible for him to deal successfully with those questions that lie outside the sphere of sense-perception altogether. This will become clear in the course of our investigation. And we must bear in mind that musical cognition implies the simultaneous cognition of a permanent and of a changeable element, and that...
Page 193 - The science of harmonics, having traversed the said sections, will find its consummation here. It is plain that the apprehension of a melody consists in noting with both ear and intellect every distinction as it arises in the successive sounds— successive, for melody, like all branches of music, consists in a successive production. For the apprehension of music depends on these two faculties, sense-perception and memory. For we must perceive the sound that is present, and remember that which is...
Page 2 - Places ; and illustrated it by specimens from various nationalities and periods, an ancient Greek hymn being included in the number. It was the unanimous verdict of all the musicians present that, while the music of the less civilized nations was often crude, barbarous, and monotonous in the highest degree, the Greek hymn stood quite alone in its absolute lack of meaning and its unredeemed ugliness; and much surprise was expressed that a nation which had delighted all succeeding generations by its...
Page 195 - ... considerations will make it patent. Mere knowledge of magnitudes does not enlighten one as to the functions of the tetrachords, or of the notes, or the differences of the genera or, briefly, the difference of simple and compound intervals, or the distinction between modulating and non-modulating scales, or the modes of melodic construction, or indeed anything else of the kind. Now if the Harmonists, as they are called, have in their ignorance seriously entertained this view, while there is nothing...
Page 191 - None of our predecessors has drawn this distinction at all; nor is this to be wondered at. For they confined their attention to the enharmonic genus, to the neglect of the other two. Students of instruments, it is true, could not fail to distinguish each genus by ear, but none of them reflected even on the question, At what point does the enharmonic begin to pass into the chromatic? For their ability to discriminate...
Page 191 - The divisibility of a whole note into two half notes, four quarter notes, etC., implies a permanent unit. [Edd.] begin to pass into the Chromatic? For their ability to discriminate each genus extended not to all the shades, inasmuch as they were not acquainted with all styles of musical composition or trained to exercise a nice discrimination in such distinctions; nor did they even observe that there were certain loci of the notes that alter their position with the change of genus. These reasons...
Page 192 - No explanation has yet been offered of the manner in which those keys are to be found, or of the principle by which one must be guided in enunciating their number. The account of the keys given by the Harmonists closely resembles the observance of the days according to which, for example, the tenth day of the month at Corinth is the fifth at Athens, and the eighth somewhere else.

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